Opinions

Thu
03
Jan
Edgar's picture

KICKAPOOS KICK BUTT IN CIVIL WAR BATTLE

Just passing through West Texas en route to Mexico, the Kickapoos went out of their way to avoid a fight on Jan. 8, 1865.

The first sign of the Kickapoo exodus from the Indian Territory was detected the previous month at the headwaters of the Brazos River. Militiamen on routine reconnaissance stumbled across an empty camp of 92 wigwams and ten tents that had been vacant a couple of days at most. The two dozen volunteers hurried home with the hysterical hunch that hundreds of hostiles were on the warpath.

Thu
27
Dec
Edgar's picture

A Christmas Tree

A Christmas tree is one of those things Like popcorn balls or angel wings That children make in the snow.

Things with beauty unsurpassed That touch our lives but never last More than a week or so.

It shines from every living room Like someone in a bright costume That’s happy to see you drop by.

 

To read more please log in or subscribe to the digital edition. https://etypeservices.com/Martin%20County%20MessengerID317/

Thu
27
Dec
Edgar's picture

FORT WORTH NAMED FOR MEXICAN WAR HERO

This Week In Texas History

Six months after leading the last American division out of Mexico City, Gen. William Jenkins Worth arrived in Galveston on Dec. 26, 1848 to take command of the department of Texas.

On the eve of the inevitable conflict with Mexico, 52 year old Worth was the most highly respected officer in the United States Army. Besides an impeccable record in war and peace, most rated him the best looking man in uniform and the finest horseman in the military.

Beginning at the bottom as a lowly private, the New Yorker served with distinction in the War of 1812. Before sustaining a serious wound in battle against the British, he rose in record time to the rank of major.

 

To read more please log in or subscribe to the digital edition. https://etypeservices.com/Martin%20County%20MessengerID317/

Thu
20
Dec
Edgar's picture

END OF MEXICAN REVOLUTION AFTER 13 BLOODY YEARS

This Week In Texas History

Confident of American support for his coup, the latest leader in the musical chairs of the Mexican Revolution called on the U.S. consul at Veracruz on Dec. 20, 1923.

To the relief of the Mexican people, 13 years of chaos and carnage appeared to be behind them. The faction-ridden struggle with its cast of self-centered characters had cost them dearly — two million dead and at least 750,000 refugees, a quarter of a million to Texas alone.

Alvaro Obregon had ruled the ruined country for three relatively peaceful years since the “suicide” of the previous president, Venustiano Carranza. Exhausted Mexicans welcomed the calm after the endless storm and prayed Obregon would keep his promise to transfer power to his anointed successor, Plutarco Elias Calles, without the usual bloodshed.

 

 

Thu
20
Dec
Edgar's picture

THE REINDEER FLU

You remember that Christmas a few years ago,when you waited all night for ol’ Santy to show

Well, I heard the reason and it just might be true, the whole bunch came down with the dang reindeer flu!

The cowboy elves had been busy all day a doctorin’ Donner and scatterin’ hay

Dancer and Prancer were febrile and snotty, Comet and Cupid went constantly potty

 

 

To read more please log in or subscribe to the digital edition. https://etypeservices.com/Martin%20County%20MessengerID317/

 

Fri
14
Dec
Edgar's picture

BOUNDARY SECRET SPARKS A PRESIDENTIAL SPAT

by Bartee Haile

A career diplomat told President Andrew Jackson on Dec.  17, 1829 the inside story of how the Sabine River became the dividing line between Louisiana and Spanish territory — a political bombshell Old Hickory waited 15 years to drop.

The 1803 treaty that closed the sweetest land deal in American history — the Louisiana Purchase — failed to set hard and fast boundaries. Negotiations with Spain remained at an impasse until 1819, when an obliging secretary of state gave up a long-standing claim to Texas in exchange for Florida. To the surprise and delight of the Spaniards, John Quincy Adams additionally agreed U.S. sovereignty ended at the Sabine River.

 

To read more please log in or subscribe to the digital edition. https://etypeservices.com/Martin%20County%20MessengerID317/

Fri
14
Dec
Edgar's picture

TANGO SED

It doesn’t make much difference how fast a horse can run if the jockey doesn’t cross the finish line with him. 

Annie is a jockey and horse trainer of good reputation. She passed along this story about a horse we’ll call TANGO SED.

 

To read more please log in or subscribe to the digital edition. https://etypeservices.com/Martin%20County%20MessengerID317/

Thu
06
Dec
Edgar's picture

GOAT DAY

20 years ago when we still lived in Brighton, CO, I had invited several friends to have Thanksgiving at my house. (A tradition my insurance agent later said I could no longer afford). Each of my guests were gracious and had asked if they could bring anything. When Mac asked what he might contribute I suggested he bring the goats.

“Goats?” he asked. I explained that Friday was Goat Day. We always built a big fire outside and spent the afternoon basting Spanish goat in sop made from Shriner’s beer. And, since the best Spanish goat came from west Texas, I figgered he could bring it.

To read more please log in or subscribe to the digital edition. https://etypeservices.com/Martin%20County%20MessengerID317/

Thu
06
Dec
Edgar's picture

WORLD WAR II CAPTIVITY OF “LOST BATTALION”

This Week In Texas History

A troop ship carrying more than 500 fighting men from Texas was a week out of Hawaii on the way to Australia on Dec. 14, 1941. National Guardsmen from Wichita Falls, Abilene, Lubbock and other towns throughout northwest Texas were drummed into federal service in November 1940. A stroke of the pen turned the weekend warriors into regular Army and lumped them together in 2nd Battalion, 131st Field Artillery Regiment, 36th Infantry Division.

Thu
29
Nov
Edgar's picture

MODEL T LEAVES ELECTRIC RAILWAY IN THE DUST

This Week In Texas History

Postal inspectors effectively pulled the plug on a Corsicana-to-Palestine electric railway on Dec. 4, 1907 by banning the fraudulent firm from the U.S. mail.

Following a modest debut in Ohio in 1889, the revolutionary new mode of transportation took the country by storm. Enthusiasts brashly boasted the so-called “interurban” would make the iron horse as obsolete as the covered wagon.

Realistic boosters never seriously suggested the electric conveyance would replace the steam locomotive, which would continue to carry cargo and passengers over long distances. However, they did believe the interurban had a promising future in the short-haul commute.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Opinions