Opinions

Fri
10
Mar

ALAMO COWARD LEAVES COMRADES TO DIE

By Bartee Haile

At the Academy Awards on Mar. 14, 1945, Joan Crawford took home the “Best Actress” Oscar for her sixty-eighth motion picture Mildred Pierce.

Life was a struggle from the start for Lucille Fay LeSueur born in San Antonio in either 1904, 1905 or 1906. Her father abandoned the family, while she was still in the womb, leaving her mother in desperately dire straits.

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Fri
03
Mar

ALAMO COWARD LEAVES COMRADES TO DIE

by Bartee Haile

While the Alamo heroes fought to the last man on Mar. 6, 1836, a cowardly former comrade found shelter in an empty cabin on the Guadalupe River. Until his own dying day, Louis Rose would stay on the run from a guilty conscience.

During a lull in the Mexican bombardment on Mar. 3, Col. Buck Travis briefed the exhausted defenders on their hopeless predicament. The garrison had three alternatives: surrender, try to escape or fight to the finish. No matter what the choice, death was inevitable.

Because he believed in the importance of holding off Santa Anna as long as humanly possible, Travis declared his determination to leave the mission feet first. Drawing a line in the dust, he invited everyone to join him in the historic stand.

 

Fri
03
Mar

Gimp

I was out in the driveway scattering stove ash when I heard the geese. It was three days until the end of the season and I was still zero for 6. They rose from the field to the north, squawking raucously and aimed straight over the house.

I dropped the coal bucket in the snow and raced back in the front door! I careened off the furniture like a bad billiard shot! At the back door I grabbed the big twelve gauge leaned against the wall and three shells that I had conveniently placed on the top of the window ledge.

 

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Fri
24
Feb

COMANCHES NOT EASY PICKINGS FOR BUFFALO HUNTERS

By Bartee Haile

Acting like the Paul Revere of the Texas Panhandle, Pat Garrett rode from camp to camp on Feb. 22, 1877 warning fellow buffalo hunters, “The Comanches are coming! The Comanches are coming!” That, of course, was not altogether true. The Indians had been in the vicinity for weeks but posed no real danger to white hunters with sense enough to keep their distance.

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Fri
24
Feb

Things Aren’t What They Seem

By Baxter Black

- If you see an Indian dressed like a cowboy, he’s probably a cowboy.

- If you see a cowboy dressed like an Indian, he’s probably a country music singer.

- If you see an Indian dressed like an Indian, he’s probably an entertainer.

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Fri
17
Feb

My Kinda Truck

By Baxter Black

I like a pickup that looks like a truck

And not like a tropical fish.

Or a two-ton poodle with running lights

Or a mutant frog on a leash.

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Fri
17
Feb

This Week In Texas History

TRIPLE LYNCHING TOUCHES OFF NASTY FEUD

by Bartee Haile

A masked mob dragged five suspected cattle thieves kicking and screaming from the Mason County jail on Feb. 18, 1875, lynched three of the terrified outlaws and touched off a nasty feud forever known as the Hoodoo War.

In the chaotic aftermath of the Civil War, Texans often took the law into their own hands. Desperate characters, who mistook common folk for easy pickings, were routinely dispatched without benefit of judge, jury or clergy.

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Mon
06
Feb

Mechanical Problems

On the coldest morning of last December my pickup wouldn’t start. It wasn’t the battery; it turned over. I ground away at the starter, manipulating the manual choke (it’s 30 years old) until the battery began to weaken.

Installing my daughter behind the wheel and hooking up the jumper cables, I squirted jets of ether down the carburetor’s throat as my daughter ground the starter. Occasionally it would catch and a ball of flame would shoot from the two barrel!

I broke off and went to town for more ether. My daughter suggested it was outta gas. She switched the gas gauge from MAIN TANK to AUX, “See,” she said, “it’s empty.”

 

 

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Mon
06
Feb

ALABAMA DOCTOR SURVIVED MASSACRE AT GOLIAD

By Bartee Haile

 

After a two-week wait on the Gulf Coast, a company of Alabama volunteers organized and led by Dr. Jack Shackelford, was officially “accepted for service” in the army of the rebellion on Feb. 3, 1836

As soon as he heard that Anglo-American colonists in Mexico’s northernmost province had risen up against the repressive central government, Shackelford called a public meeting in the town of Courtland near the Tennessee state line. The respected physician and War of 1812 veteran asked who would join him in the fight for an independent Texas, and practically every able-bodied male in attendance, including the doctor’s son and two nephews, stepped forward.

 

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Thu
26
Jan

High Wire Act

by Baxter Black

One slow summer afternoon I was down at the calving shed near the river. For two months each spring it was like salmon spawning at rush hour! Hundreds of heifers, covies of calves, never ending nights, dozens of days, aches, dings, scratches, sutures, sleeves, scours, shots, dry eyes, chapped hands and sticky stuff in the hair on your arms. But that was last spring. Now I was puttering around in the quiet barn. I was picking up empty bottles and trash, straightening the corner room with its heater and cot. The sun’s ray sliced through the cracks in the wall and spotlighted dust motes floating around.

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