Opinions

Fri
03
Jun

SCHOOL BUSES FOR SALE OR RENT

Every time I went to southeast Texas I kept noticing acres of school buses on a large business lot on Interstate 10 near Winnie. I thought it was a school bus graveyard. Boy, was I wrong. Earlier this year on my way to Beaumont I passed it again and decided to check it out. I turned around, went back there, and met the friendly office manager, Greg Simon. He told me all about the business, which is owned by Carl Smith of Baytown.  

Fri
03
Jun

TRAILS FAR FROM HAPPY FOR B-WESTERN COWBOY

By Bartee Haile

The matinee feature at Waco’s Fox Theater on Jun. 4, 1948 was “Chicago Kid” starring Don “Red” Barry, the well-known cowboy actor, in a crime drama for a change. The future rider of the B-western range was born Donald Barry de Acosta in Houston in January 1912. Despite his small stature – five feet four and a half inches – he was good enough at football, presumably as a running back, to win a college scholarship. In one version of how the tiny Texan got his big Hollywood break, John Wayne and Mickey Rooney happened to see him play in an exhibition game between a team of college all-stars and UCLA. The diminutive Rooney, who at five-two had to look up to Barry, arranged a speaking part for him in “Boys Town,” but he could not remember his lines and the director kicked the flustered first-timer off the set.

Fri
27
May

WORLD FAMOUS NATURALIST VISITS TEXAS REPUBLIC

by Bartee Haile
 
A resolution was introduced in the senate of the Lone Star Republic on May 25, 1837 to make a world famous naturalist and wildlife painter an “honorary Texan.” John James Audubon was born Jean Rabin on a Caribbean island in 1785 to parents from two very different worlds. His father was a rich French seafarer, merchant, planter and slave trader, while his mother was a Creole servant who died less than a year after giving birth.
 
Fri
27
May

The Story of Little Chip

I danced with another woman tonight My wife didn’t seem to mind. We took to the floor like a pair of swans That fate forever entwined. Leaving our wake through the dancers who flowed Like notes in search of a song We tested our two step, tried out a waltz and laughed when something went wrong!.
 
Fri
20
May

The Story of Little Chip

by Baxter Black
 
Most of us, rural or urban can get attached to an animal. Our barn cat Jay Jay has a special place in my mind. Somebody dumped a litter of kittens on the church grounds. I took three of the little tomcats. We got them situated and when the time came I castrated them in the tack room. Within six months only one was left. The others had been victims of coyotes or other predators that fly, crawl, slither or pounce. Jay Jay staked his claim and learned to move around the corrals and outbuildings “up high”.
 
Fri
20
May

LIFE OF PIONEER FAMILY ON WEST TEXAS FRONTIER

by Bartee Haile
 
Richard Franklin Tankersley enlisted in an all-volunteer company of “minutemen” on May 24, 1858 and spent the next 60 days combing the West Texas countryside for hostiles. While he was making the frontier safe for neighbors and perfect strangers, his wife and six children — alone and unprotected — faced the constant threat of attack from the same Indians. Either the head of the household minimized the danger or never gave his loved ones’ predicament a second thought.
 
Fri
13
May

Newborn Troubles

Being born is a traumatic experience! I remember... no, I guess I don’t? It’s an amazing blessing that we can’t recall much about our first days of existence. That thought occurred to me as I stared over the fence at the prettiest little heifer calf. She was red with a white face and black eyelashes. Her mama was a black bally and the previous owner says she’d been bred to a Simmental bull. Sure made a dandy calf. 

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Fri
13
May

FLOUR SALESMAN RISES TO PINNACLE OF TEXAS POLITICS

by Bartee Haile

An entertaining and unquestionably eccentric era in Texas politics came to an end on May 11, 1969 with the death of former governor and U.S. Senator “Pappy” O’Daniel. A job offer from a Fort Worth milling company brought the 35 year old salesman to Texas in 1925. Three years later, a deal with a group of unemployed musicians put Wilbert Lee O’Daniel on the road to fame and fortune. 

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Fri
06
May

Lost

by Baxter Black
 
A source of pride amongst cowboys is knowin’ the lay of the land. And any poor fool that gets lost they figger ain’t much of a hand! They said, “We’ll all meet at Bull Crick!” Then looked at me like a trainee! “Draw me a map and I’ll
find it! Columbus had nothin’ on me!” Daylight broke into my windshield, headed south and loaded for bear.
 
Fri
06
May

CORPUS CHRISTI FOUNDER SHADIEST OF CHARACTERS

by Bartee Haile
 
On May 4, 1855, a Philadelphia grand jury indicted Henry L. Kinney, erstwhile smuggler and scandalous founder of Corpus Christi, for his part in a plot to invade Nicaragua. The Pennsylvania native was 18, when he paid a visit to relatives at the Irish colony of San Patricio in 1832. He wandered back to Texas five years later and set up shop on the western bank of the Nueces River, where it empties into Corpus Christi Bay.
 

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