Opinions

Fri
30
Sep
Edgar's picture

SURGEON’S SON CHOOSES ACTING OVER MEDICINE

By Bartee Haile
 
The life and career of actor Zachary Scott, handsome star of stage and screen, were cut short by cancer on Oct. 3, 1965. Zachary Thomson Scott, Jr. was born in Austin in 1914. The son of a surgeon was expected to follow in his father’s footsteps but never showed the slightest interest in medicine. He was drawn instead to drama and began appearing in plays while still in high school.
 
Fri
23
Sep
Edgar's picture

SANTA FE PIONEERS TRICKED INTO SURRENDERING

by Bartee Haile 

Just as the Mexican officer repeated his request on Sep. 24, 1841 that the 97 Texans lay down their guns, a missing comrade mysteriously appeared and insisted the wild goose chase into New Mexico was not worth the loss of a single life. The blood had hardly dried on the battlefield at San Jacinto, when the new Republic declared the Rio Grande to be its western boundary. It was no coincidence that the claim encompassed the 300 year old settlement of Santa Fe, end of the famous trail that every year attracted $200 million in trade.

 

Fri
23
Sep
Edgar's picture

Be Deliberate

by Baxter Black 

“If you’re in a hurry, be deliberate.” It always fascinated me that Charmayne James’ horse Scamper looked like he was running slower than the others, but his time was always faster! Was his stride longer? Was his body longer? Were his legs longer? Did it take less strides to go the same distance as the others? Or was each step done with such precision that it eliminated even the slightest misstep that would add micro-seconds to the run? I watch with awe the rodeo calf ropers that flop the calf to the ground and tie him down with two wraps and a hooey, faster than the eye can see! They usually take the short cut on the tie and wait on pins and needles, hoping it will stay tight the required 6 seconds. However, he takes a risk by going for speed.

 

Fri
16
Sep
Edgar's picture

County Fair Buy Out

“Roy, can you show us the scar? It’s gotta be a big one!” “What scar?” “Where they took your conscience out!” “Aw Kendall, yer full of it! What would an order buyer know about a conscience anyway!” “I was just down to the fair office. I noticed that you put a floor bid on all the kids’ show steers. I’ve never seen anything so low! It’s shameful! Little kids came up to me with tears in their eyes. It broke my heart. And you, the owner of one of the biggest auction markets in the state!” 
 
Fri
16
Sep
Edgar's picture

RECORD CASUALTIES FOR TEXAS REBS AT ANTIETAM

by Bartee Haile

 

Texans died in record numbers on Sep. 17, 1862 at the Battle of Antietam or Sharpsburg, bloodiest of the Civil War. Never one to rest on his laurels, Gen. Robert E. Lee invaded Maryland six days after winning the rematch at Bull Run. His objectives, endorsed by President Jefferson Davis, were to bring the border state into the Confederacy and the enemy, whose morale was at an all-time low, to the bargaining table.

 

Fri
09
Sep
Edgar's picture

The Cowboy Image

by Baxter Black

The livestock business has an effective symbol that has withstood the loving treatment of Hollywood, Nashville and Madison Ave. It is now under attack by the Anti-Livestock Industry. It is the cowboy. Hollywood made heroes of cowboys who always got the bad guy, practiced safe shooting and could leap on their horse from a burning train! Then Hollywood gave us the urban cowboy who could disco and wore a straw hat made of oatmeal, rattlesnake heads and sweepings off a chicken house floor!   

Fri
09
Sep
Edgar's picture

TEXANS SURVIVE FIRST UBOAT SINKING OF WWII

by Bartee Haile

A Houston judge learned on Sep. 8, 1939 that his daughter not only had survived the U-boat sinking of the British passenger ship Athenia but also had been hailed as a heroine by the American ambassador. In her last letter before leaving Europe, Helen Hannay told her parents not to worry. “There may be a delay, but we will get out all right. We aren’t in the least afraid.” The teenaged traveler closed on a prophetic note: “I am certainly glad to have had this lovely trip and to have seen all the beautiful things before they are blown up.”  

Fri
02
Sep
Edgar's picture

Branded

Many’s the time I’ve come home with yellow paint on my coveralls. Caterpillar yellow. Spot it a mile away! We used it to mark our cull cows. Two paint brands we’d borrowed from the sheepherders were dipped in the paint can and daubed on the cow’s rump according to their condition. O for old or open. P for old and pregnant. So marked, we could sort ‘em off the good bred keepers if they got mixed. The yellow stayed for quite a while. Well, you’ve seen how long it lasts on a road grader.

 

Fri
02
Sep
Edgar's picture

TAP-DANCING TEENAGER KNOCKED ’EM DEAD

by Bartee Haile 

In a Sep. 2, 1939 review of George White’s “Scandals of 1939,” a Broadway critic reserved his highest praise for a teenager from Texas named Ann Miller, who stopped the show every night with her high-energy tap dance. The future fixture of Hollywood musicals in the 1930’s and 1940’s was born Lucille Ann Collier at her grandparent’s place near Nacogdoches. The year was 1923, and that is important because she would later change it to find work in Tinsel Town.

 

Fri
26
Aug
Edgar's picture

DIPLOMAT DEFIES OWN GOVERNMENT TO END MEXICAN WAR

by Bartee Haile
 
A lowly state department functionary, whose only claim to fame was his marriage to Thomas Jefferson’s granddaughter, opened negotiations with Mexico on Aug. 27, 1847 to finally bring an end to the war that had dragged on long enough. By February 1847, the Mexicans’ intransigence was giving President James K. Polk fits. Though badly beaten in every battle, the hopelessly outclassed opponent refused to concede defeat and showed not the slightest interest in stopping the carnage.
 

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