Opinions

Wed
22
Nov
Edgar's picture

Thanksgiving

By Baxter Black

It’s Thanksgiving here in the U.S.A. Canada had theirs in October. Good neighbors, we are. It is something both countries can be thankful for. Either one of us could have moved in, only to find North Korea or Syria lived next door.

Our countries are blessed. North America’s a pretty good neighborhood. We have big backyards full of timber, pasture, minerals and oil. We have flowerbeds with fertile soil growing corn and rice and peaches.

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Fri
17
Nov
Edgar's picture

BOWIE GOES LOOKING FOR SILVER AND FINDS INDIANS

By Bartee Haile

Jim Bowie went looking for underground riches in 1831 but found instead a bunch of belligerent Indians on Nov. 20.

“The Lost Bowie Mine” was not always lost nor was it always named after the famous frontiersman. In 1753 Spaniards searching for a place to put a mission in present-day Llano County learned of a cedro de almagre or hill of red ocher. Several explorers were shown the mineral-rich mound by obliging Apaches.

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Fri
17
Nov
Edgar's picture

Cold Feet

By Baxter Black

Yer lookin’ at a feller with no tennis shoes, a ’76 GMC pickup, an outhouse and a learning permit for a cell phone. But! Lest you lump me into that group of stodgy ol’ dinosaurs that cling to the days of Garth Brooks, pygmy Angus, and real spare tires...Let me assure you that I have stepped boldly into the modern world of manly footwear.

A constant recurring memory of workin’ cows when I first started years ago was cold feet. Everybody wore their regular regulation cowboy boots with five-buckle overshoes. And everybody’s feet got cold.

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Fri
10
Nov
Edgar's picture

HOUSTON’S “HARD TO GET” STRATEGY WORKS WITH WASHINGTON

by Bartee Haile

Concerned over Texas’ increasingly cozy relationship with the British, the U.S. Secretary of State informed the Lone Star minister on Nov. 10, 1843 that Washington was ready to reopen annexation talks.

Instead of telling Abel P. Upshur that it was about time, Isaac Van Zandt played it cool by simply saying he would see if his president was interested. Reading over the diplomat’s report a few days later, Sam Houston smiled at his success in shaking up his complacent former countrymen.

Fri
10
Nov
Edgar's picture

Moose Alert

Many of the animals rights groups give awards to citizens who perform good deeds on behalf of animals. These deeds are usually along the line of rescuing mistreated horses, homeless cats or HBC dogs (hit by car). Rarely do any cowboys receive an award. I would like to nominate Andy for his daring moose rescue last fall.

Andy was still trainin’ on Gracie as they rode across the high mountain pasture in the Uintas. He had named her Gracie with the same inversely convoluted reasoning with which U.S. senators refer to each other as “My distinguished colleague...”

 

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Fri
03
Nov
Edgar's picture

LT. GOVERNOR NOT MUCH OF A SHORTCUT

By Bartee Haile

T. Whitfield Davidson was elected lieutenant governor on Nov. 7, 1922, but the second highest office in the Lone Star State turned out not to be a short-cut to the top rung on the political ladder.

The twenty-eighth lieutenant governor of Texas has a lot of company in the history books. Of the 44 men who have held the Number Two job in the state government, only a baker’s dozen spent even a day as governor.

In the beginning, the junior governorship looked like a surefire steppingstone. Although all did not follow the same path, five of the first seven lieutenants reached the summit. James Pinckney Henderson had been in charge of the newly annexed Republic just three months, when he took a leave of absence to lead Texas troops in the war with Mexico. His second-in-command, Albert C. Horton, kept the home fires burning for six months until the warrior governor returned, and never again sought public office.

 

Fri
03
Nov
Edgar's picture

The Supersalesman

Slicker’n deer guts on a doorstep! Smooth as a filly’s nose! Here in this jug’s a miracle drug So new that nobody knows!

Feed it, inject it or plant it, Stick it under an ear. Pick any breed, results guaranteed.

 

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Fri
27
Oct
Edgar's picture

TWO TEXAS QUARTERBACKS SHARE NLF RECORD

By Bartee Haile

On Oct. 28, 1962, New York Giants quarterback Y.A. Tittle equaled the National Football League (NFL) record for touchdown passes in a single game by throwing seven against the Washington Redskins.

But “The Bald Eagle,” as Tittle was fondly known, was not the first Texan to join one of pro football’s most exclusive fraternities. Ten years earlier, Adrian Burk had also pulled off the same amazing feat.

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Fri
27
Oct
Edgar's picture

Festus and the Coon

Doc had escaped his busy Omaha practice and met his friend Stevo west of Eustace for a little sport. “Ever hunted coon on one of these?” Doc asked as he jumped two mules outta the back of his pickup stockracks.

Billy and Festus were sensible mules who could handle most anything. The two hunters saddled up, sheathed their rifles and released the hound dogs.

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Fri
20
Oct
Edgar's picture

WHY ALL THE FUSS OVER A MUD FORT?

By Bartee Haile

A small company of Texas rebels rode out of Goliad on Oct. 24, 1835 with orders to attack the government garrison at Fort Lipantitlan.

As conceived by Capt. Philip Dimitt during the early days of the independence uprising, the Lipantitlan Expedition had two important objectives: the rescue of a couple of rebel prisoners and the destruction of the strategic fortification on the Nueces River. And by “destruction” Dimitt made it crystal clear to Ira Westover that he meant the death or capture of each and every defender.

 

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