Opinions

Fri
10
Jul

EXILED ARISTOCRAT SPENT HALF OF LIFE IN TEXAS

A handsome lady-killer, who lived his last four decades in Texas, was arrested on Jul. 9, 1943 for the murder of his father-in-law, the wealthiest man in the Bahamas. The woman, who gave birth to Alfred de Marigny on an island
in the Indian Ocean in 1910, ran off with another man when her child was just three years old. But his father must have been an even worse parent because the son renounced his aristocratic birthright, including the title of count, and took his mother’s surname.
 
Thu
02
Jul

No Respect For Baxter

A good friend from the Texas panhandle sent me a printed poster of a new program enacted by the Amarillo Humane Society. It is designed to encourage dog and cat owners to spay or castrate their pets. On the front is a picture of a frightened, bugeyed brachygnathic Pug. The accompanying headline says, NO BALLS FOR BAXTER – MATCHING SPAY/NEUTER INITIATIVE! I admit I didn’t know how to take it…was it a compliment? Was it a signal to the pitcher to only throw strikes when I was at bat? Were they revoking my invitation to attend the dance in Cow Town? Did they make specific restrictions on what certain people would bring to the beach? Would I no longer be allowed to  answer, “I’m havin’ a b_  

 

To view more please log in or subscribe to the digital edition 

Thu
02
Jul

WILEY POST SET FLYING RECORDS WITH ONE EYE CLOSED

Wiley Post and his Australian navigator landed in New YorkCity on Jul. 1, 1931 completing an epic around-the-world flight in record-breaking time. Two states claimed Wiley Hardeman Post as a native son. Texas had birth going for it since the intrepid aviator began his short life in Van Zandt County a couple of years shy of the twentieth century. Oklahoma, however, had residency on its side because the Posts relocated north of the Red River when Wiley was nine.The simple pleasures of farm life never appealed to the youngster, whose head always seemed to be in the clouds. Wiley regularly skipped his chores to whittle model planes out of scrap wood and to dream of the day when he would defy the law of gravity. Post’s first fling into the wild blue yonder came in 1919 courtesy of a gypsy barnstormer. Five years later at an Oklahoma air show, he did such a fine job of filling in for the injured parachutist that the dangerous job became his permanently.  

 

Fri
19
Jun

Dead Sheep

There’s been a dead sheepout in Brent’s wheat field for a month. Emilio had a band of ewes on the corn stalks across the road. I reckon that one got hit by a car. The sheep have moved on. Brent plowed his field. Plowed around the carcass. Now it is sort of mouldering into the earth. I see it every time I drive to town. 
 
Fri
19
Jun

“PRINCESS OF THE PANHANDLE” LIVED HIGH ON THE HOG

The only daughter of one of Texas’ wealthiest cattle kings married a blueblood from Philadelphia on Jun. 17, 1902 in the family mansion at Decatur. Starting with a small herd of Longhorns in the 1850’s, Dan and son Tom Waggoner turned parts of six North Texas counties into a 750 square-mile cattle empire. At the end of the nineteenth century, the colossal Three D Ranch covered more than a million acres. 
 
Fri
12
Jun

Agricultural Ignorance

The editor of the Delmarva Farmer made the observation that Americans as a whole havereached the Age of Agricultural Ignorance. This stage in our civilization is a direct result of the lack of “kids growing up on the farm.”
 
Fri
12
Jun

COLONISTS BUTT HEADS WITH AMERICAN-BORN BULLY

Taking advantage of a lull in the “disturbance” at Anahuac on Jun. 13, 1832, riled-up colonists compiled a list of grievances against the U.S.-born bully whose heavy-handed methods had caused the confrontation in the first place. 
 
Fri
05
Jun

AUDUBON PAINTED TEXAS WILDLIFE FOR POSTERITY

A Republic senator introduced a resolution on Jun. 4, 1837 to make a world famous naturalist and wildlife painter an “honorary Texan.” John James Audubon was born Jean Rabin on a Caribbean island in 1785 to parents from two very different worlds. His father was a rich French seafarer, merchant, planter and slave trader, while his mother was a creole servant who died less than a year after giving birth. 

To view more please log in or subscribe to the digital edition 

Fri
05
Jun

Saturday Night

Dang it, someone spilt their coffee on the deck of cards again. Probably one of the new guys. This place looks like a den of hibernating coyotes. Shoot, they’ve broke another chair! And I’d been countin’ on a little game of solitaire. Kids. I’ve seen a million walkin’ through this bunkhouse door.
 
Fri
29
May

Louie Snappin’ Bees

Ol’ Louie loved bees. Of all the things I remember about him, I remember that best. He’d be layin’ out in the front yard, day dreamin’ and sunnin’ himself when I’d see an eye open and an ear cock. Then he’d spring to his feet and start snappin’ at the air. His jaws would be makin’ a sound like someone hittin’ the edge of a water tank with a two by four. When he caught a bee he’d spit it back out real fast! I never figgered whether he liked the taste of ‘em; maybe they still had honey clingin’ to their boots or maybe it was just a game. I don’t know.

To view more please log in or subscribe to the digital edition

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Opinions