Opinions

Wed
25
Nov

BRADY MAN WAS B-17 MACHINE GUNNER

Herb Cavness of Brady was a teenager when he entered World War Two in 1943. He was a waist gunner on a B-17 and flew 25 missions in Europe with the 8th Air Force. “We were stationed in England and flew out of there,” he says. “Our missions were mostly over Germany.”

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Wed
25
Nov

BROTHERS OPEN STAGECOACH SERVICE TO CALIFORNIA

by Bartee Haile

The first load of U.S. Mail left San Antonio on Nov. 27, 1857 on a mule-drawn stage bound for San Diego, California. At the reins were George and James Giddings, old hands at hauling freight and the occasional paying customer through Indian infested West Texas. Undeterred by the fate of their brother Giles, one of the few Anglo-Americans killed at the Battle of San Jacinto, they headed for Texas in 1845.

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Fri
20
Nov

LUNATICS DEMAND ELLEN DEGENERES REMOVE LEATHER FROM CLOTHING LINE! OH, NO!

by Ellen Degeneres

PizzaCare2 gathered more than 1,800 signatures! To the dismay of animal rights activists and vegan martyrs, her “luxury lifestyle” brand of clothing has added a $250 pair of Brazilian shoes. I would guess Ellen is a pretty tough cookie. She has promoted herself as a vegan and animal rights advocate. Now she’s offended them. It’s common whenever the extremist’s lobbyists get their claws into susceptible, famous prey like Ellen, they cling like kudzu. Some quotes of her predators now heaping shame and disappointment on her: “I’m so saddened…”, “…I hope our voices will remind her…”, “…it isn’t just heart breaking, it’s baffling.”

 

Fri
20
Nov

FAMOUS HEART SURGEONS FEUDED FOR 40 YEARS

by Bartee Haile

Dr. Michael DeBakey added another “first” to his list of accomplishments with a successful coronary artery bypass in a Houston hospital on Nov. 23, 1964. But the Lake Charles, Louisiana native would not have the surgical world all to himself for long. Dr. Denton Cooley, estranged protégé turned world acclaimed rival, would perform the first implant of a human heart on American soil three and a half years later.

 

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Fri
13
Nov

Sale Barn Transactions

John B and I were discussing how hard it must be for an auctioneer to say somethin’ good about every thing that walks through a sale barn ring. For the novice, we offer the following explanations for these rather ambiguous descriptions. “AIN’T SHE THE MAMA KIND!” (If you ain’t got a good sortin’ alley or a horse and a long rope, you better not try and get close to her calf!)
 
Fri
13
Nov

FORT WORTH COUNTERS WITH ITS OWN CENTENNIAL

by Bartee Haile
 
The four-month run of The Frontier Centennial, Fort Worth’s answer to the official celebration of Texas independence in Dallas, came to an end on Nov. 14, 1936. The first prominent Texan to suggest a grand party for Texas’ hundredth birthday was former governor Jim Hogg in 1900. Other individuals and organizations repeated the call during the decades that followed even as the deepening Depression forced the state government to tighten its purse strings. Despite the hard times and critics who felt there were worthier ways to spend the money, the decision was made to go ahead with a centennial exposition in 1936. On the strength of a $7.8 million cash commitment and the permanent State Fair site, Dallas beat out Houston and San Antonio for the honor of hosting the event.
 
Fri
06
Nov

The Squeeze Chute

The sun shone dull on its metal bars. The snow lay drifted against her frame. Behind the barn near the rusting cars She’s ended up all crippled and lame. An ol’ squeeze chute I’d opened and closed On a hundred thousand heads and horns Dragged to the bone yard to decompose Forgotten rose in a bed of thorns.

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Fri
06
Nov

HOUSTON TURNS BACKWATER BAYOU INTO SHIP CHANNEL

By Bartee Haile

More dignitaries than anyone in attendance could shake a stick at gathered on Nov. 10, 1914 for the gala grand opening of the Port of Houston and Ship Channel. Today the 25-mile-long waterway and the inland harbor it serves are taken for granted, as if both were somehow always there and not man-made marvels. But Houstonians and Texans in general would do well to remember that the second busiest port in the United States was the product of a herculean effort by their ancestors.

Fri
30
Oct

The Squeeze Chute

The sun shone dull on its metal bars. The snow lay drifted against her frame. Behind the barn near the rusting cars She’s ended up all crippled and lame. An ol’ squeeze chute I’d opened and closed On a hundred thousand heads and horns Dragged to the bone yard to decompose Forgotten rose in a bed of thorns. I lay a hand on the frozen steel, The head bar polished as smooth as glass. The mem’ries flowed and the past revealed Itself like magic. I knew at last.

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Fri
30
Oct

GHOST STORIES FROM JEFFERSON FOR HALLOWEEN

By Bartee Haile

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