Opinions

Thu
04
Dec

Try Me, A Rodeo Story

When Marvin Garrett nodded his head, no one knew that eight seconds later the Thomas and Mack Arena would be covered with goose bumps. Marvin drew “Try Me” in the fourth round at the National Finals Rodeo 1989. He marked her out and hung the steel to’er like the rods on a Union Pacific driver! “Try Me” jumped the track!

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Thu
04
Dec

UNDERDOG HORNS KNOCK AGGIES OFF LOFTY PERCH

The week after taking a Thanksgiving tumble against the University of Texas, the defending national champions from Texas A&M fell to sixth in the final college football poll of Dec. 3, 1940. Following another embarrassingly bad season in 1936, the University of Texas fired its 20th coach in 44 years. Instead of the usual cheap fix, the board of regents spent the big bucks to hire a gridiron genius. At an annual salary of $15,000, Dana Xenophon Bible stood to make nearly twice as much as the college president until the legislature smoothed the educator’s ruffled feathers with a hefty pay hike. When it came to teaching x’s and o’s, baldheaded Bible was in a league of his own. He won 72, lost 19, tied nine and captured five Southwest Conference titles in 11 seasons at Texas A&M. Leaving College Station for the Corn Belt, the pigskin mastermind added half a dozen Big Six championships to his collection during an eight-year stay at Nebraska.

Wed
26
Nov

The Gap of No Understanding

by Baxter Black
 
There is a bridge to cross in understanding between those who live off the land (rural) and those who benefit from it (urban), but have no personal relationship with it. Examples abound. I suspect a large portion of urbanites imagine the wolf as a gladiator of the woods.
 
Wed
26
Nov

YELLOW FEVER WAS EBOLA IN 1800’S TEXAS

by Bartee Haile
 
The Texas Congress picked Houston as the new capital of the Lone Star Republic over Matagorda and Washington-on-the-Brazos on Nov. 30, 1836. The Allen brothers had three years to convince skeptics that their humid heaven-on-earth should be the permanent seat of government.
 
Fri
21
Nov

Hirin’ a Cowboy

by Baxter Black
 
There’s an old saying that “A cowboy is born, not made.” However, I’d like to propose that if you’re hirin’ a cowboy to help you take care of your stock, you might look twice. You can’t necessarily assume that because he’s got a black hat and is broke, that he’s a cowboy. He might need a little educatin’ to your way of doin’ things. Even a team roper can be taught to check cattle.
 
Fri
21
Nov

PEACH STATE VOLUNTEERS FIGHT AND DIE FOR TEXAS

by Bartee Haile
 
Georgians rallied at Macon on Nov. 22, 1835 in support of the valiant struggle for Texas independence, and at the end of the evening 32 volunteers stepped forward to form the nucleus of the famed and ill-fated Georgia Battalion.
 
Fri
14
Nov

Farming Dreams

By Baxter Black
 
In the land of Nod a movement sprung up to build houses without the use of power tools. The advocates of organic construction (OC) supported the movement because it prohibited the recovery and use of the carbon coal and oil. To be OC any lumber used must be hand-hewn, saws must be manually operated. Mule power is approved.
 
Fri
14
Nov

KARLA FAYE HAD IT COMING BUT NOT CHIPITA

By Bartee Haile
 
Leading up to the 1998 execution of ax murderer Karla Faye Tucker, there were repeated references to the fact that a woman had not been put to death in Texas since Nov. 13, 1863. Her name was Chipita Rodriguez and this is her sad but true story.
 
Thu
06
Nov

Keepin’ Busy

Skip, whattya doin’ now days?” “Oh, I’m doin’ a little day work for Irsik and ridin’ two green colts for $50 a month. I think I’ve just about sold that load of salvage lumber I traded Mr. Jolly out of. Some guy came by the other day and wants me to audition for the Marlboro Man. Said they pay pretty good even if they don’t pick me. I’ve put down on some lease pasture. If my pardner comes through we’re gonna turn out a few steers. I’ve got some other deals workin’, playin’ guitar with Butch and Jim on Fridays, shoein’ the odd horse now and then. Ol’ Man Gammon pays me to irrigate his yard every other Sunday. Other than that ...not much.”
 
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Thu
06
Nov

GINGER ROGERS DANCED AND ACTED UP A STORM

by Bartee Haile
 
Fourteen year old Ginger Rogers danced circles around the competition at the Baker Hotel in Dallas on Nov. 9, 1925 to win first place in the state Charleston contest. Virginia Katherine McMath was born in Independence, Missouri – Harry Truman’s hometown – but like most “naturalized” Texans came to the Lone Star State just as soon as she could. In the case of Ginger, a nickname from a cousin who could not pronounce “Virginia,” it was in 1922 at the age of 11 when she moved to Fort Worth with her mother and stepfather, John Rogers.
 
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