Opinions

Fri
05
Jun

AUDUBON PAINTED TEXAS WILDLIFE FOR POSTERITY

A Republic senator introduced a resolution on Jun. 4, 1837 to make a world famous naturalist and wildlife painter an “honorary Texan.” John James Audubon was born Jean Rabin on a Caribbean island in 1785 to parents from two very different worlds. His father was a rich French seafarer, merchant, planter and slave trader, while his mother was a creole servant who died less than a year after giving birth. 

To view more please log in or subscribe to the digital edition 

Fri
05
Jun

Saturday Night

Dang it, someone spilt their coffee on the deck of cards again. Probably one of the new guys. This place looks like a den of hibernating coyotes. Shoot, they’ve broke another chair! And I’d been countin’ on a little game of solitaire. Kids. I’ve seen a million walkin’ through this bunkhouse door.
 
Fri
29
May

Louie Snappin’ Bees

Ol’ Louie loved bees. Of all the things I remember about him, I remember that best. He’d be layin’ out in the front yard, day dreamin’ and sunnin’ himself when I’d see an eye open and an ear cock. Then he’d spring to his feet and start snappin’ at the air. His jaws would be makin’ a sound like someone hittin’ the edge of a water tank with a two by four. When he caught a bee he’d spit it back out real fast! I never figgered whether he liked the taste of ‘em; maybe they still had honey clingin’ to their boots or maybe it was just a game. I don’t know.

To view more please log in or subscribe to the digital edition

Fri
29
May

GREELEY GOES WEST TO WARM TEXAS WELCOME

The New Orleans Picayune in a May 27, 1871 editorial echoed the same concern Horace Greeley expressed about his trip to Houston, when the New York publisher wrote, “I go to Texas reluctantly.” The Crescent City newspaper hoped “nothing will occur during the expected visit to the southwestern section that may mar his pleasure or leave upon his memory an impression derogatory to the reputation of our people for courtesy.” The Galveston-based Flake’s Daily Bulletin strongly objected to the unwarranted warning. “Why need the press be cautioning the people against making fools of themselves? There is no more danger that the people of the South will treat Horace Greeley otherwise than courteously than that they will treat any other man so.”

To view more please log in or subscribe to the digital edition

Fri
22
May

Koinonia

According to the crowd you are hanging out with, you may be familiar with this word or you may not. This is a Greek word translated in the Bible as “fellowship,” or “communing ‘also meaning “sharing in common.” When a person is born again, becomes a Christian, they have a hunger to commune, to have fellowship with likeminded people.
 
Fri
22
May

THE PALO DURO CANYON’S OUTDOOR PRODUCTION IS 50

Fifty years ago some residents of Canyon were trying to find ways to utilize the Palo Duro Canyon, One of those residents was Margaret Harper, who brought up the idea of having a play in the canyon. People thought she was crazy at first, but soon decided there might be something to that suggestion. Mrs. Harper contacted Paul Green, a Pulitzer Prize-Winning playwright, who came down and wrote a play about pioneers coming to the panhandle. Residents got excited and built an amphitheater with eighteen hundred seats.
 
Fri
15
May

Loose Cow

One of the greatest feelings in the world is to see a cow loose on the road and realize it’s not yours! I know that sounds awful. And I do feel a little guilty sayin’ it, but it’s true! Of course, I do feel bad for whos’ever critter it is. And many’s the time I’ve driven ‘em down my lane and penned ‘em up and called the owner of the wandering beast.

To view more please log in or subscribe to the digital edition 

Fri
15
May

NO ONE RED OR WHITE MUCH CARED FOR THE KRONKS

Under pressure from the Mexican government to give the Karankawas one more chance, Anglo-American colonists signed a peace treaty with the flesh-eating Indians on May 13, 1827.  enerations before the white man came on the scene, the Kronks were driven from Louisiana by neighbors outraged by their loathsome taste for human flesh. United by intermarriage and cannibalism, the confederation of five clans soon roamed coastal Texas from Galveston to Padre Island.

 

To view more please log in or subscribe to the digital edition 

Fri
08
May

BUZZARDS IN THE HOUSE

Willy Dilworth of Brenham is chief tax appraiser for Washington County. It is his job to place a value on property. “I get some strange requests,” he says. “A guy from New York who owned some land here called me and asked me to raise the value on his property, even though it was under water. Very unusual, but I accommodated him.”
 
Fri
08
May

TEXAS INVENTOR ANSWERED EVERY TYPIST’S PRAYER

The female inventor of one of the most commonly used office products of the twentieth century changed the name of her creation from “Mistake Out” to “Liquid Paper” on May 7, 1968. Forty-four years earlier, Bette Claire McMurray was born in Dallas. She grew up in San Antonio, attended Alamo Heights high school and became a “war bride” at 18 when she said “I do” days before the groom was shipped overseas.
 

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Opinions