Opinions

Sun
04
Jan

RICE GIVEN NO CHANCE IN 1938 COTTON BOWL

With the possible exception of their mothers, no one gave the Owls of Rice Institute much of a chance against the unbeaten Colorado Buffaloes and All-American “Whizzer” White in the second Cotton Bowl on New Year’s Day 1938. In Jimmy Kitts, the “Harvard of the South” got two coaches for the price of one. While still in his twenties, the former Southern Methodist star had won a pair of national high school basketball championships at Athens, Texas. Since he also knew a thing or two about the pigskin pastime, Rice hired him in 1931 to coach the freshman football team in addition to varsity basketball.

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Fri
19
Dec

Inventors

by Baxter Black
 
I ran into a mental inventor a while back and it put me to thinkin’. You know the kinda person I’m talkin’ about, the ones that get the ideas that years later someone else makes money on. Take for instance, that fellow who rolled the first stogie and smoked it. Chances are he tried several kinds of flammable organic herbage before he discovered tobacco.
 
Fri
19
Dec

BASEBALL’S “GRAY EAGLE” FACES BANISHMENT

by Bartee Haile
 
Judge Kenesaw Mountain Landis announced on Dec. 21, 1926 that Ty Cobb and Tris Speaker stood accused of betting on a fixed baseball game. With the banishment of the “Black Sox” by the stern commissioner still fresh in their minds, fans had to wonder whether the Georgia Peach and the pride of Hubbard, Texas would ever play again.
 
Thu
11
Dec

Cowboy Christmas Carol

This is the story of Tiny Slim Crachett, a genuine reprobate Who squandered his money and wasted his love until it was almost too late. He was just your typical cowboy, honest, brave and sincere And he lay on his bunk one Christmas Eve night belching up nachos and beer When a vision appeared at the foot of his bed. He stared at the apparition, “Must be that microwave pizza I ate,” he blinked and shifted position. “I ain’t no pizza you commonbred fool! Your brain’s as dull as your knife. I am the ghost of Christmas past, and cowboy...This is your life!”

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Thu
11
Dec

Texans follow old Ben Milam to victory

by Bartee Haile

After six days of hand-to-hand fighting in the streets of San Antonio, Gen. Martin Perfecto de Cos surrendered to the ragtag rebels in the early hours of Dec. 11, 1835. Seven days earlier, the downcast Texans surrounding the province’s largest town voted to suspend their six-week siege and withdraw for the winter. But as they prepared to pull out, surprising news reached the rebels that changed the course of the Revolution.

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Thu
04
Dec

Try Me, A Rodeo Story

When Marvin Garrett nodded his head, no one knew that eight seconds later the Thomas and Mack Arena would be covered with goose bumps. Marvin drew “Try Me” in the fourth round at the National Finals Rodeo 1989. He marked her out and hung the steel to’er like the rods on a Union Pacific driver! “Try Me” jumped the track!

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Thu
04
Dec

UNDERDOG HORNS KNOCK AGGIES OFF LOFTY PERCH

The week after taking a Thanksgiving tumble against the University of Texas, the defending national champions from Texas A&M fell to sixth in the final college football poll of Dec. 3, 1940. Following another embarrassingly bad season in 1936, the University of Texas fired its 20th coach in 44 years. Instead of the usual cheap fix, the board of regents spent the big bucks to hire a gridiron genius. At an annual salary of $15,000, Dana Xenophon Bible stood to make nearly twice as much as the college president until the legislature smoothed the educator’s ruffled feathers with a hefty pay hike. When it came to teaching x’s and o’s, baldheaded Bible was in a league of his own. He won 72, lost 19, tied nine and captured five Southwest Conference titles in 11 seasons at Texas A&M. Leaving College Station for the Corn Belt, the pigskin mastermind added half a dozen Big Six championships to his collection during an eight-year stay at Nebraska.

Wed
26
Nov

The Gap of No Understanding

by Baxter Black
 
There is a bridge to cross in understanding between those who live off the land (rural) and those who benefit from it (urban), but have no personal relationship with it. Examples abound. I suspect a large portion of urbanites imagine the wolf as a gladiator of the woods.
 
Wed
26
Nov

YELLOW FEVER WAS EBOLA IN 1800’S TEXAS

by Bartee Haile
 
The Texas Congress picked Houston as the new capital of the Lone Star Republic over Matagorda and Washington-on-the-Brazos on Nov. 30, 1836. The Allen brothers had three years to convince skeptics that their humid heaven-on-earth should be the permanent seat of government.
 
Fri
21
Nov

Hirin’ a Cowboy

by Baxter Black
 
There’s an old saying that “A cowboy is born, not made.” However, I’d like to propose that if you’re hirin’ a cowboy to help you take care of your stock, you might look twice. You can’t necessarily assume that because he’s got a black hat and is broke, that he’s a cowboy. He might need a little educatin’ to your way of doin’ things. Even a team roper can be taught to check cattle.
 

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