Opinions

Fri
15
Aug

It’s a Wonder You Weren’t Killed!

When you hear cowboys tellin’ stories, it’s common for a listener to say, “It’s a wonder you weren’t killed!” “Well, all I did was rope that sorry, no good, fightin’ bull with the crooked horn and tie him to a post in the corral, then throw another rope on him and tied it to the other side, then pulled him tight ‘cause I was by myself, you know.
 
Fri
15
Aug

TEXAN LOSES TEMPER ONE TIME TOO MANY

David S. Terry, a Texas expatriate with a red-hot temper, ran into a Supreme Court justice on Aug. 14, 1889 and gave his mortal enemy a piece of his mind and the back of his hand. The younger brother of Benjamin F. Terry, famous founder of Terry’s Texas Rangers, went West after seeing action in the Mexican War. But the pick-and-shovel routine in the California gold field was not for the gifted attorney, and he turned to practicing law.
 
Fri
08
Aug

DALLAS DRESSMAKERS STAGE HISTORIC STRIKE

In the sixth month of the longest strike in Dallas history, dressmakers tore the clothes off the backs of replacement workers, who tried to cross their picket lines on Aug. 7, 1935. A labor official from the Midwest was so shocked by the starvation wages and wretched working conditions of women hatters in Dallas sweatshops that he said they were “worse off than former negro slaves.”
 
Fri
08
Aug

Who Would Like RFDtv Off The Air?

Who would like RFDtv off the air? Or U.S. Farm Report? Who would like Farm Bureaus shut down, along with the National Cattlemen’s Assn, the Pork Producers, the Egg Council, the Northern Ag Network, Range  Magazine, the Delmarva Farmer, the Farm Journal, the Beef Checkoff, the Brownfield Ag Network? Who would like to make it illegal for movie stars, sports stars, heroes, singers and baby calves to be pictured with a milk moustache? 
 
Fri
01
Aug

Larger Riders Means Larger Horses

An interview with several dud wranglers and packers showed they have accommodated the increasing number of large people. Using Belgians, Percherons and their crosses are mentioned often. Draft horses are gentle beasts by nature and most wranglers are ready with a hefty footstool to assist in mounting up. This is done out of respect for the infrequent rider whose needs must be met. I admire the wrangler’s willingness despite the increase in cost to shoe, maintain and feed the heavy horses. The object is to give the customer a “good experience.”
 
Fri
01
Aug

INNKEEPER TO THE WORLD GOT START IN TEXAS

On Aug. 4, 1925, Conrad Hilton celebrated the grand opening of the first hotel he built from the ground up and the first he put his name on — the Dallas Hilton. Even though a governor once introduced him as a native son, Conrad Nicholson Hilton was born at San Antonio, New Mexico not San Antonio, Texas on Christmas Day 1887. But like so many naturalized Texans, he got here just as soon as he could.
 
Fri
25
Jul

Stupid is as Stupid Does

by Baxter Black.
 
In the movie Forrest Gump, the hero is a nice man with a low IQ, whose simplistic reasoning usually made sense. His response to anyone who called him stupid was to say, “Stupid is as stupid does.” My interpretation of that phrase is, “You don’t have to be stupid to be stupid.” One can have a high IQ and still be stupid. Which leads me into my observation that we in America have the “luxury to be stupid.”

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Fri
25
Jul

IMPEACHED EX-GOVERNOR TRIES TO WIN BACK OFFICE

by Bartee Haile.
 
The Dallas Morning News in the Jul. 27, 1918 issue endorsed William P. Hobby for governor with an editorial cartoon showing a tight-lipped Texan casting his ballot “for law and order.” The illustration was a none too subtle slap at the colorless incumbent’s challenger, “Farmer Jim” Ferguson who had been removed from office the previous year. The endorsement of the Big D daily made it a clean sweep among the major newspapers in the state for the disgraced ex-governor’s replacement.

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Thu
17
Jul

SERENDIPITY ON THE ROAD

For my birthday in June we stayed in the El Capitan Hotel in Van Horn, a historic structure built in the 30’s. On the way we stopped in Midland for a couple of interviews. Jimmy Patterson talked about his new book on the history of Midland, then we visited Magic Jack, who teaches magic to kids. In Fort Davis I interviewed Joe Duncan, who owns the El Capitan. He told me about its history, how it went from a hotel to a bank, then back to a hotel. Fort Davis has a bunch of fascinating folks.
 
Thu
17
Jul

Was Jean Lafitte the First President of Texas?

When his last rival worthy of the name fled Galveston for a healthier climate on Jul. 21, 1817, the self-proclaimed “President of Texas” consolidated complete control of the island. Whether Jean Lafitte made that ludicrous claim after going into business on the strip of sand off the Texas coast in the spring of 1817 is highly questionable as are most stories told about the legendary pirate. Maybe the buccaneers that terrorized the Gulf of Mexico under his leadership called him “president” as an inside joke. But no matter because it was this blend of fact and fiction that in the end made Lafitte immortal.
 

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