Opinions

Thu
26
Jun

Tree Implanting

By Baxter Black.
 
When I was a lad I remember my brother John wouldn’t go anywhere without his “blanky.” My son and daughter each had a stuffed animal, a fuzzy rabbit and a sock monkey named Chango. I think Grandmother Phyllis made them. Looking at the photographs, Fuzzy and Chango accompanied us on many vacation trips. Alas, the monkey jumped ship in Puerto Vallarta. It was traumatic.
 
Thu
26
Jun

INDIAN FIGHTER DOES THE ARMY’S JOB

By Bartee Haile.
 
On Jul. 1, 1855, Gov. Elisha Pease called upon James Callahan, a veteran Indian fighter with a hard-as-nails reputation, to save an endangered species — the frontier settler. After nine years of the Potomac politicians going back on their word, nothing Washington did should have surprised the citizens of the biggest state in the Union. But Texans never imagined the United States government would leave the Lone Star frontier unprotected.
 
Fri
20
Jun

THE FIREMAN POET OF EASTLAND

“My dad wrote poetry and I guess it just came natural to me,” says Sam Williams of Eastland. “When I’m inspired about something, I write it.” Sam owns a construction company in Eastland, where he serves as a volunteer fireman. He remembers a poem handed down from generations of his family: “I had a mule. His name was Solemn Slick. All that I could dream was how that mule could kick. He could kick a feather from a dove or break an elephant’s back. He backed up against the Rio Grand and kicked it off the track. Swam the Gulf of Mexico settin’ on a log. Whipped a dozen Yankees and swallowed a yellow dog.”
 
Fri
20
Jun

LYNCHING STARTS DEM CONVENTION OFF ON WRONG FOOT

Early arrivals to the Democratic National Convention were greeted by a gruesome sight on the morning of Jun. 20, 1928 – a lynching victim hanging from a Houston bridge. Five months earlier, Democratic leaders picked the Bayou City as the site for their quadrennial get-together, the first meeting of its kind in a southern state since the Civil War. Credit went to businessman Jesse Jones, national finance chairman, whose expert stringpulling made his hometown of 250,000 the winning entry.
 
Fri
13
Jun

Don’t Forget the Cowboy and the Horse

By Baxter Black.
 
Sometimes, when we go to our livestock meetings and see all the technology we forget about the cowboy and the horse. In the PowerPoint presentation it all looks so orderly as the healthy steer standing in the hydraulic chute smiles at the camera while the hired hand in a clean shirt demonstrates a procedure with music playing in the background.

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Fri
13
Jun

DALLAS DOCTOR FALLS FOR FAMOUS FEMME FATALE

By Bartee Haile.
 
Clara Bow, the scandalous “It Girl,” slipped into Dallas under the cover of darkness on Jun. 15, 1930 in search of an ex-lover and $30,000 in hush money. The femme fatale of silent films entered a Los Angeles hospital for an appendectomy in February 1928. On the day of her discharge, Clara’s constant companion Tui Lorraine walked in on the famous patient and a handsome intern “locked in a passionate embrace.” The embarrassed doctor turned beet red and ran out of the room.

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Fri
06
Jun

Man Against Beast

by Baxter Black.
 
Man against beast is a theme in many a story, from days of yore to 21st century wolves ravaging baby calves. It normally takes a hero to slay the dragon or sue the EPA. Heroes are often battling with giants, against all odds; David and Goliath, Jack and the Beanstalk, or the Alamosa High School Maroons vs Miami Heat.

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Fri
06
Jun

BLOODY LAST ACT OF EAST TEXAS FEUD

by Bartee Haile.
 
When the sun rose over San Augustine on Jun. 4, 1900, two dozen or more early-bird snipers already encircled the courthouse. The curtain was about to go up on the last act of a long-running East Texas feud, and there would be bodies to bury on both sides before the bloody day was done. The private wars Texans once called feuds were waged by a breed that believed the only justice worth having was up-close and personal. Warrior clans that showed no mercy and asked for none were plentiful around San Augustine in the late 1800’s.

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Fri
30
May

NOT EVEN BLINDNESS COULD STOP “STOVEPIPE”

Two years after pulling off the slickest military trick of the Civil War and only two months before a life-changing piece of bad luck, Adam Rankin Johnson was promoted to brigadier general in the Confederate army. Born and raised at Henderson on the Kentucky side of the Ohio River, Johnson’s education ended at age 12, when he left school to work full-time in a drugstore 
 
Fri
30
May

Camping Out In Wyoming

It was just another camping trip with friends. A gathering, a return to nature, to get a taste of what life was like in the Wyoming forests and plains before Napoleon Bonaparte sold it to Thomas Jefferson in 1803. The transaction should have been called the Cheyenne Purchase except the Indian tribes never got a dime. 
 

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