Opinions

Thu
23
Oct

TRIBE PAID HIGH PRICE FOR BEFRIENDING TEXANS

A surprise attack by four hostile tribes on Oct. 25, 1862, cut the number of Tonkawas in half leaving less than 150 still alive and kicking. Half a dozen small groups of native peoples based in Central Texas banded together in the early seventeenth century. Even though this new tribe called themselves Tickanwatick, a tongue-twister meaning “the most human of men,” in time they came to be known as the Tonkawa, Waco for “they all live together.” Maternal clans were the cornerstone of Tonkawa society. Children were born into their mothers’ clan, and men became members of their spouses’ clan. A brother married his dead brother’s widow, a common practice among Anglo-American Texans well into the twentieth century, and a man’s property was inherited not by his children but his nephews and nieces.
 
Thu
09
Oct

To The Feedlot Hoss

Boys, I offer a toast To that creature tied to the post Who through all his ills and occasional spills Still gives us more than his most He’s black, bay or he’s brown
 
Thu
09
Oct

CREW TALKED CAPTAIN OUT OF ABANDONING “HOUSTON”

A Japanese torpedo so badly damaged the HOUSTON on the night of Oct. 13, 1944 that the captain of the light cruiser gave the order to “abandon ship.”The first but soon forgotten U.S. naval vessel to bear the name of the Bayou City was a German cargo carrier seized during the First World War. The second was a heavy cruiser christened in 1929 by the daughter of a former mayor of Texas’ biggest town. The USS HOUSTON was a personal favorite of Franklin D. Roosvelt and his choice for four official cruises between 1934 and 1939. After the sneak attack on Pearl Harbor, the presidential pleasure craft became the flagship of the Asiatic Fleet. The Japanese claimed so many times to have sunk the HOUSTON early in the war that American sailors jokingly nicknamed her the “Galloping Ghost of the Java Coast.” But the enemy finally made good on their boast on the tragic night of Mar. 1, 1942.
 
Fri
03
Oct

The Dilemma of Immigration

By Baxter Black
 
“Give me your tired, your poor, your huddled masses yearning to breathe free…” The message that rings down through the Bible from Exodus to Revelations, “Blessed are ye poor for yours is the Kingdom of God.” This beatitude was planted deep in the Judeo-Christian settlers that built America and wrote our Constitution.
 
Fri
26
Sep

Plant’s Rights!

By Baxter Black.
 
BEWARE CONNOISSEURS! A new discovery may change the way America eats! Love your broccoli? Savor your home-grown tomatoes? Would give your eye-teeth for a blueberry pie? This discovery could create sweeping protests and black markets like marijuana has never seen! Plants feel pain! That’s right, Plants feel pain!

 

Fri
26
Sep

POLICE CHIEF GOES OVER TO THE DARK SIDE

by Bartee Haile.
 
After 13 months on the run, a former small-town police chief wanted for murder and armed robbery was captured in Tennessee on Sep. 27, 1929. Had Tom Shook always been a crooked cop concealing his crimes behind a badge? If that was true, he sure had fooled a bunch of people during his eight-year career in law enforcement with different departments in North Texas. And the town council in Electra, the Red River boomtown northwest of Wichita Falls, would not had hired him as the new chief of police had he not come highly recommended.
 

 

Fri
19
Sep

BIG-LEAGUE PITCHER HAS REMARKABLE ROOKIE RUN

by Bartee Haile.
 
With his suddenly famous fiancée watching from the grandstand on Sep. 17, 1934, Lynwood “Schoolboy” Rowe kept his winning streak alive by pitching a near-perfect shut-out against the Washington Senators. The Waco native and son of a trapeze artist was 23, when the Tigers brought him up from their Beaumont farm team in 1933.

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Fri
12
Sep

Fair Board Drama

I went to America last week…the middle of America, Kansas, to a county fair. I flew into Denver and drove across miles and miles of green prairie. If America has a heart, it’s out here on the Plains. It’s not an easy place to live. You have to earn its respect. It will test you with blizzards, tornadoes, floods, droughts, dust, plagues and loneliness. It is often all or none 
 
Fri
12
Sep

TEXANS TAKE PART IN LAST OAKLAHOMA LAND RUSH

The official starter fired his pistol on Sep. 16, 1893, and thousands of land-hungry Americans, including a slew of eager Texans,  were off and running for the Cherokee Outlet! Seventy-four years earlier, the federal government initiated eviction proceedings against the Five Civilized Tribes from their ancestral grounds in the southeastern United States
 
Fri
05
Sep

A Happy Day in the Milking Barn

When someone tells me they grew up on a dairy farm I say, “You have paid your dues, my son.” The offspring of a dairyman that follows in his father’s footstep is as scarce as a second generation Nobel Prize winner, bomb dismanteler, or president of North Korea! So it is with pleasure that I congratulate those dairymen who are havin’ a heyday this year.
 

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