Opinions

Thu
20
Mar

The Saga of the Spotted Skunk

By Baxter Black.
 
If it weren’t so ridiculous it would make you cry. The Endangered Species Act has popped up again like a stinky diaper at day care. This time it is the Plains Spotted Skunk, one of four species of spotted skunks that can be found almost anywhere from Canada to Mexico and coast to coast except, apparently, in the backyard of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. According to the Feds, “The decline of small farms, the advent of agriculture practices that encourage removal of fence rows and brush piles, intensive use of pesticide, improved grain management practices, and the end of large haystack construction are implicated as potential causes for the species’ decline in landscapes dominated by human activity.” Whew.
 
Thu
20
Mar

TEXAS WOMEN FIGHT LONG AND HARD FOR THE VOTE

By Bartee Haile.
 
On Mar. 25, 1918, in a special ceremony at the state capitol, Gov. William P. Hobby signed into law the Primary Election Law giving the women of Texas at long last the right to vote. On hand for the momentous occasion were standard bearers Jane Y. McCallum and Minnie Fisher Cunningham. Often down but never out, the resolute crusaders refused to give up the fight for the female franchise.
 
Fri
14
Mar

A Footlong Prolapse

By Baxter Black.
 
It was a Colorado winter afternoon when the boys spotted a big crossbred cow wobblin’ along with her calf trailing behind and a prolapse as big as an army issue duffle bag! When they got closer they could see the calf had sucked but the prolapse looked a little worse for the wear. Merle and Earl were a’horseback two miles from the corrals. The cow was domesticated but certainly not tame! She was a range cow. They’re like KMart employees; you can’t actually walk up to one!

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Fri
14
Mar

LINDBERGH LUCKY EVEN BEFORE HISTORIC SOLO

By Bartee Haile.
 
“Slim” Lindbergh reported for pilot training at Brooks Field in San Antonio on Mar. 18, 1924 just three years before the skinny college dropout became the most famous man in the world To the dismay of his father, a Minnesota congressman, Charles A. Lindbergh Jr. gave up his engineering studies in 1920 to become a barnstormer. The youth spent the next two years risking his neck for pocket change and having the time of his life.

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Fri
07
Mar

TWO-SPORT STAR DIED A HERO ON IWO

On Mar. 6, 1945, First Lieutenant Jack Lummus, a professional football and baseball player from Ennis, took command of a Marine rifle platoon on the blood-soaked island of Iwo Jima. After three girls, an Ellis County cotton farmer finally got the chance in 1915 to give a son his name. Andrew Jackson Lummus, Jr. grew up big and strong excelling in every sport he went out for at Ennis high school. 
 
Fri
07
Mar

Record Snowfalls

“We can expect to see extreme cold with increasing frequency as global warming continues.” The President’s science and technology advisor - January 11, 2014. I cringe at how ludicrous global warming climatologists must feel these last two winters. Nature is pooping in their nest. Did he mean “extreme heat” instead of cold? Can they have it both ways?  
 
Fri
28
Feb

TEXAS WAS ELVIS’ LAUNCHING PAD TO STARDOM

Eighty-eight thousand paying customers packed the Astrodome on Mar. 3, 1974 for Elvis Presley’s two sold-out performances, his last at the Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo. “He went off to Texas and came home famous,” Elvis’ mother marveled early in her son’s fantastic career. The Lone Star State was not only his launching pad to stardom, but also where the King of Rock and Roll got his second wind
 
Fri
28
Feb

The Price of Ivory

On the north side of Denver abides the city of Commerce City. There, last fall, U. S. officials dumped millions of dollars worth of ivory tusks, carvings, and jewelry into a steel rock crusher and pulverized it into dust and tiny chips.
The officials’ objective was to reduce the slaughter of tens of thousands of elephants each year
 
Fri
21
Feb

A Gift of Glasses

We have lots of folks come through our office and home. We try to be hospitable. While cleaning up the office, I found a pair of glasses. They were the frameless kind that make you look like Benjamin Franklin. I asked around the office, yet no one claimed them. 
 
Fri
21
Feb

ZEB PIKE HAD NOTHING TO FEAR FROM SPANIARDS

Lt. Zebulon Pike spent another sleepless night on Feb. 25, 1807 worrying whether hostile Spanish troops might at any moment overrun his makeshift fort. Lewis and Clark were homeward bound from the Pacific Northwest in 1806, when 28 year old Zeb Pike embarked on his own inspection tour of the Southwest. His secret mission was to slip into New Mexico from the north, analyze the economic potential of the thriving colony and pinpoint the weak spots in the Spanish defenses
 

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