Opinions

Thu
06
Nov

GINGER ROGERS DANCED AND ACTED UP A STORM

by Bartee Haile
 
Fourteen year old Ginger Rogers danced circles around the competition at the Baker Hotel in Dallas on Nov. 9, 1925 to win first place in the state Charleston contest. Virginia Katherine McMath was born in Independence, Missouri – Harry Truman’s hometown – but like most “naturalized” Texans came to the Lone Star State just as soon as she could. In the case of Ginger, a nickname from a cousin who could not pronounce “Virginia,” it was in 1922 at the age of 11 when she moved to Fort Worth with her mother and stepfather, John Rogers.
 
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Fri
31
Oct

THE MULE MAN’S DAUGHTER

Ann Reeves of Pittsburg grew up during World War II. “My dad was a farmer during the war and he had all different kinds of crops that went to both servicemen and the local citizens. He had to get his sweet potatoes in one day and couldn’t find anybody to help him. He had this one man who was picking up the crates in the field, handing them to my dad and he was putting them on a flat bed truck.

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Fri
31
Oct

THE ALAMO – MOST HAUNTED PLACE IN TEXAS?

What better time than Halloween to delve into the otherworldly legends surrounding Texas’ most sacred site? If only a fraction of the many eyewitness accounts and second-hand reports contain a particle of truth, the Alamo has to be the most haunted place in the Lone Star State. The original ghost sighting was without a doubt the most frightening. Santa Anna was on his way to his richly deserved comeuppance at San Jacinto, when he sent a messenger back to San Antonio with orders for the rearguard to burn the battered ruins of the Alamo. The bodies of the slain Texans already had been reduced to ashes by a matching pair of funeral pyres, so it made a twisted kind of sense that the mission they died defending should suffer the same fate.

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Thu
23
Oct

A PISTOL PACKING MAMA

She has been named A Woman of Distinction by more than one group. She won a pink Cadillac for selling Mary Kay products. She won a white Mercedes for selling the Arbonne line of health and beauty aids. She was named Restaurateur of the Year for 2009 by the Texas Res- taurant Association. And she could have been arrested for at- tempted bank robbery. Her name is Linda Love, the new head of food services at Baptist Retirement Community in San Angelo. For her, it’s full circle. When she was growing up in San Angelo she was a candy striper there as a teenager.
 
Thu
23
Oct

TRIBE PAID HIGH PRICE FOR BEFRIENDING TEXANS

A surprise attack by four hostile tribes on Oct. 25, 1862, cut the number of Tonkawas in half leaving less than 150 still alive and kicking. Half a dozen small groups of native peoples based in Central Texas banded together in the early seventeenth century. Even though this new tribe called themselves Tickanwatick, a tongue-twister meaning “the most human of men,” in time they came to be known as the Tonkawa, Waco for “they all live together.” Maternal clans were the cornerstone of Tonkawa society. Children were born into their mothers’ clan, and men became members of their spouses’ clan. A brother married his dead brother’s widow, a common practice among Anglo-American Texans well into the twentieth century, and a man’s property was inherited not by his children but his nephews and nieces.
 
Thu
09
Oct

To The Feedlot Hoss

Boys, I offer a toast To that creature tied to the post Who through all his ills and occasional spills Still gives us more than his most He’s black, bay or he’s brown
 
Thu
09
Oct

CREW TALKED CAPTAIN OUT OF ABANDONING “HOUSTON”

A Japanese torpedo so badly damaged the HOUSTON on the night of Oct. 13, 1944 that the captain of the light cruiser gave the order to “abandon ship.”The first but soon forgotten U.S. naval vessel to bear the name of the Bayou City was a German cargo carrier seized during the First World War. The second was a heavy cruiser christened in 1929 by the daughter of a former mayor of Texas’ biggest town. The USS HOUSTON was a personal favorite of Franklin D. Roosvelt and his choice for four official cruises between 1934 and 1939. After the sneak attack on Pearl Harbor, the presidential pleasure craft became the flagship of the Asiatic Fleet. The Japanese claimed so many times to have sunk the HOUSTON early in the war that American sailors jokingly nicknamed her the “Galloping Ghost of the Java Coast.” But the enemy finally made good on their boast on the tragic night of Mar. 1, 1942.
 
Fri
03
Oct

The Dilemma of Immigration

By Baxter Black
 
“Give me your tired, your poor, your huddled masses yearning to breathe free…” The message that rings down through the Bible from Exodus to Revelations, “Blessed are ye poor for yours is the Kingdom of God.” This beatitude was planted deep in the Judeo-Christian settlers that built America and wrote our Constitution.
 
Fri
26
Sep

Plant’s Rights!

By Baxter Black.
 
BEWARE CONNOISSEURS! A new discovery may change the way America eats! Love your broccoli? Savor your home-grown tomatoes? Would give your eye-teeth for a blueberry pie? This discovery could create sweeping protests and black markets like marijuana has never seen! Plants feel pain! That’s right, Plants feel pain!

 

Fri
26
Sep

POLICE CHIEF GOES OVER TO THE DARK SIDE

by Bartee Haile.
 
After 13 months on the run, a former small-town police chief wanted for murder and armed robbery was captured in Tennessee on Sep. 27, 1929. Had Tom Shook always been a crooked cop concealing his crimes behind a badge? If that was true, he sure had fooled a bunch of people during his eight-year career in law enforcement with different departments in North Texas. And the town council in Electra, the Red River boomtown northwest of Wichita Falls, would not had hired him as the new chief of police had he not come highly recommended.
 

 

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