Opinions

Fri
06
Jun

BLOODY LAST ACT OF EAST TEXAS FEUD

by Bartee Haile.
 
When the sun rose over San Augustine on Jun. 4, 1900, two dozen or more early-bird snipers already encircled the courthouse. The curtain was about to go up on the last act of a long-running East Texas feud, and there would be bodies to bury on both sides before the bloody day was done. The private wars Texans once called feuds were waged by a breed that believed the only justice worth having was up-close and personal. Warrior clans that showed no mercy and asked for none were plentiful around San Augustine in the late 1800’s.

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Fri
30
May

NOT EVEN BLINDNESS COULD STOP “STOVEPIPE”

Two years after pulling off the slickest military trick of the Civil War and only two months before a life-changing piece of bad luck, Adam Rankin Johnson was promoted to brigadier general in the Confederate army. Born and raised at Henderson on the Kentucky side of the Ohio River, Johnson’s education ended at age 12, when he left school to work full-time in a drugstore 
 
Fri
30
May

Camping Out In Wyoming

It was just another camping trip with friends. A gathering, a return to nature, to get a taste of what life was like in the Wyoming forests and plains before Napoleon Bonaparte sold it to Thomas Jefferson in 1803. The transaction should have been called the Cheyenne Purchase except the Indian tribes never got a dime. 
 
Thu
22
May

They Hang Horse Thieves

by Baxter Black.

What is the mentality of a thief? Is it a complete lack of the concept that “it belongs to someone else?” Or is it envy that someone else has something you would like? Is it resentment against the victim? Do they think it can be justified by explaining to themselves “Nobody is using it? It must be junk? I need it more than they do? They can buy another one? I need the money for drugs, to pay my rent, to get a new car?”
 
Thu
22
May

SMALL-TOWN MAYOR STOPS RAILROAD IN ITS TRACKS

by Bartee Haile.

Choosing his words carefully after an all-day meeting with railroad representatives on May 25, 1949, Mayor T. Leo Moore refrained from declaring victory in his protracted struggle with the Fort Worth & Denver but did maintain the train would continue to stop at Electra under certain circumstances. How did a small town west of Wichita Falls and a drop kick from the Red River end up with the same name as the daughter of King Agamemnon of Trojan War fame? Few of the folks, who in 1902 chose to call their settlement Electra, had read Homer.
 
Fri
16
May

ON THE EDGE OF COMMON SENSE

Bronc to Breakfast is my favorite Charlie Russell painting. The scene represents the typical roundup out west. In the foreground is a campfire with cooking pots and pans on the fire or hanging from the cross bar. A cowboy is sitting with his plate of beans, Cookie’s in an apron standing by the chuck wagon and in the background are some cowboys by the horses on a picket line. 
 
Fri
16
May

BARNSTORMERS FLY IN CIRCLES OVER FORT WORTH

Hundreds of Cow Towners skipped church on Sunday, May 19, 1929 and slipped out to the municipal airport to give the Fort Worth a rousing send-off. Though dangerously overloaded with fuel and every conceivable carry-on, the monoplane cleared the runway with plenty of room to spare at exactly 11:33 a.m. Reg L. Robbins and James Kelly climbed to 2,000 feet and set their course for nowhere 
 
Fri
02
May

ROOSEVELT RALLIES HIS “RIDERS” IN SAN ANTONIO

Hundreds of “Rough Riders” descended on San Antonio on May 5, 1898 itching to lend Teddy Roosevelt a hand in kicking the Spaniards out of Cuba. In the crowded lobby of the Menger Hotel, tobacco-chewing cowboys rubbed shoulders with East Coast dandies, one and all anxious to renew acquaintances with the charismatic Roosevelt  
 
Fri
02
May

Rudy

I’ve got a year-old Australian Shepherd dog. I don’t intend to use him for livestock; his job will be barker. We live in a rural area. The dogs are penned at  night and released during the day into a three acre house and barn lot surrounded by shock collar wire. 
 
Thu
17
Apr

The Western Migration Invasion

by Baxter Black.
 
The legalization of marijuana in Colorado has brought to a head a common point of contention that has happened in state after state. It is a generational change, a population shift that is the result of the inevitable roll of civilization. It also marks a shift from rural to urban. Over the years I have watched certain western towns and cities evolve into mini-metros that no longer belong to the state that bore them; Santa Fe, Aspen, Missoula, Sedona, Monterey and Deer Valley.

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