Opinions

Thu
16
May
Edgar's picture

Three Wheel Roping

I’ve always sorta figgered the reason there is more cowboy poetry than there is farmer poetry has to do with horses. Most cowboy poetry is about wrecks. One person plus one cow equals a wreck now and then. One person plus one cow plus one horse equals a wreck every time! But then farmers discovered the three-wheeler! Honda invented the ATV! It was the farmer’s first real horse replacement, complete with speed, weight, maneuvering, swerving, rolling, flipping, crashing and getting bucked off! The bonus was…they became a great inspiration for Cowboy/ Farmer poetry!

Kelly was workin’ for John, his brother and his dad. They were farmers who ran steers on wheat pasture in western Oklahoma. They didn’t use horses. They used three wheelers but they treated them like horses.

Thu
09
May
Edgar's picture

Inheriting The Family Farm

The latest statistics show that less then 2% of the population is directly involved in production agriculture. It is a function of an increasing overall population and a limited amount of farm ground. Technology is able to keep up, so that less bodies are required to produce an ever increasing cornucopia of food and fiber.

But on a personal level the story isn’t quite so simple.

Tom was raised on a dairy farm in the Great Lake region; 300 cows, 900 acres. His grandfather established the farm and passed it down to Tom’s father. Tom’s childhood memories are of work. By the time his mother came in to wake him and his two brothers for school, she and dad had already finished the morning milking. By nine years of age he was already part of the family farm. Until he was old enough to milk he pushed cows to the barn, fed calves, forked silage and did whatever kids do, which was plenty.

 

 

Thu
09
May
Edgar's picture

FARM BOY PITCHED HIS WAY TO FORGOTTEN FAME

The long baseball career of Fred “Firpo” Marberry, the major league’s first relief pitcher, ended on May 9, 1941 with his unconditional release by the Fort Worth Cats of the Texas League.

Even though Fred Marberry was the tenth child born to a Mississippi couple, who resettled in north central Texas, there were only four siblings waiting to welcome him in 1898. The other five were already dead and gone.

Growing up on a farm near Streetman south of Dallas, Fred had no time for extracurricular activities. After school, weekends and in the summer, there were always plenty of chores to do. Except for an occasional game with the local amateur team, he played very little baseball in his teens.

 

 

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Thu
02
May
Edgar's picture

Nuggets

Cornerstone

We know the cornerstone of Christianity is Jesus Christ. There are four things about that stone I would like for us to look at. It is what we think about Jesus that shapes our eternity.

What we think does not change what or who He is, but what we think changes our relationship and with Him and our eternal destiny. You see, “Jesus is the same yesterday, today, and forever” [Heb. 13:8]. So the first thing we want to see is;

God is good! ”The Lord is good; His mercy is everlasting; and His truth endures to all generations.”[Ps. 100:5].

 

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Thu
02
May
Edgar's picture

BAXTER BLACK

I was visiting with Lisa after their bull sale this spring. She remarked on the overabundance of bulls for sale around the country this year. Competition is stiff. She said she counted the number of bulls advertised on Superior Livestock video and figgered if they were placed end to end they would reach farther than you could point!

Her husband Lee, ever the deep thinker, pondered on the dilemma and came up with the perfect modern genetic answer; outlaw polygamy in cows! By gosh, I thought, a solution that fits the times. One bull per cow. But then I began to think it through. Would each cowyage (as opposed to marriage in horses) be intended for life? Or would we allow for divorce and recowyage (or dehorse and remarriage)?

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Thu
25
Apr
Edgar's picture

A PROM TO REMEMBER

Tumbleweed Part Owner of Texas

living room. He plays it every day. After his years as a traveling musician, he taught at South Plains College, known for its country music sequence. Cary retired after 23 years at South Plains but continues to perform around Lubbock.

He has written a book about his experiences titled Almost A Professional. It’s just out. The book has photos and stories. One story is about a 1982 high school prom that has become a Lubbock legend. He was with the Manes Brothers Band then.

“Some high school students got together and decided to stage their own independent prom. I think maybe there were 50 or 60 students and their dates. These mavericks pooled their money together, got their parents to

 

Thu
25
Apr
Edgar's picture

Nuggets

Laminin

Several years ago I heard about a thing called Laminin and looked it up on the internet. It is such an awesome part of creation.

The Bible says we are fearful and wonderfully made. That is easy to receive knowing who made us and seeing a new born baby with its tiny fingernails, well you know what I mean. Knowing How big our God is , how He spoke the universe into existence, how He formed our human bodies together with amazing detail then breathed Life into mankind.

 

 

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Thu
25
Apr
Edgar's picture

FAMOUS BARNSTORMER FORGOT TO PACK PARACHUTE

This Week In Texas History

Ignoring an old friend’s foreboding premonition, Bessie Coleman took her stunt plane for a test spin prior to a Florida air show on Apr. 30, 1926. But the safety-conscious barnstormer somehow forgot to pack a parachute.

“Brave Bessie” was born in 1893 less than a dozen miles from the Arkansas border in the northeast Texas community of Atlanta. Her father, who was three-quarters Cherokee, returned to his reservation roots around 1900, and her mother, strongwilled daughter of a freed slave, settled at Waxahachie south of Dallas.

Even though four offspring had died in childhood and five had left home, Susan Coleman still had four hungry mouths to feed. Life was a day-to-day struggle, as she took in washing and little Bessie and a sister picked cotton, but no one missed a meal in the loving home.

 

Thu
25
Apr
Edgar's picture

BAXTER BLACK

“Age-in’ a cow is ‘bout the thing I hate most. Seems like they can tell the instant you cross the line into the strike zone.”

We all nodded sympathetically with Jeff’s pronouncement. Each cowman in the circle of chairs could remember a blow to the ribs that ruined his day.

“Well your doin’ it all wrong,” spoke Gary, “Mouthin’em is easy. Just check ‘em after you feed in the evenin’. Timing is critical. Wait till the sun is setting low and drive along the west side of the fence or feedbunk. They’ll look up to check you out, all of ‘em chompin’ and chewin’ and curious. If you’ve planned it right the sun will light up their dentures like you had a spotlight!”

 

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Thu
18
Apr
Edgar's picture

Two Jumps

Two Jumps said he used to ride bulls. In spite of his name, he tried. He had grit, determination and bravado on his side. Unfortunately, he lacked skill. He was naturally inept And as life laid down her cowpies, that’s precisely where he stepped. But even a hard luck cowboy’s entitled to one guru Whose faith in him is undaunted, whose loyalty strays true blue. Now, all of the young bronc stompers and bullriders knew Lecille. A rodeo clown and hero to all who strapped on the steel.

 

 

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