Opinions

Thu
31
Jan
Edgar's picture

THE LOST ART OF SHAVING IS BEING REVIVED

Tumbleweed Part Owner of Texas

Greg Smith of Brady makes shaving soap and after-shave in a variety of flavors.

“Grandpa’s Barber Shop is a traditional, clean, old school kind of barbershop scent,” he says. “We’ve got Cherry Pipe which is a sweet cherry and tobacco scent. Weekend Rodeo is a pretty popular one. It’s a mixture of tobacco and leather fragrances. We have a scent called Mr. Pepper and it flies off the shelf. It, of course, has the Dr. Pepper soft drink flavor.”

He tries to think of flavors that would be commonplace in Texas.

 

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Thu
31
Jan
Edgar's picture

TREASURE HUNTER URGES INDIAN GENOCIDE

This Week In Texas History

For the second time in less than a year, Alexander Dupont set out on Feb. 2, 1789 in search of the storied silver mines of San Saba. The French-speaking adventurer was born in Flanders in the second decade of the eighteenth century, around the time his native country was conquered by Napoleon and disappeared forever from the map of Europe. That would have made Dupont between 50 or 60 years old, when he wandered into Texas in the 1770’s.

What is known of the footloose Flemish comes from his diary. Although the journal begins in the summer of 1787, it is clear the author had been in Texas for ten years or longer and knew his way around the Spanish province better than most Europeans.

Thu
24
Jan
Edgar's picture

BROTHERS QUIT FARMING FOR TRAIN ROBBING

An unnamed gang of unidentified outlaws robbed a train two counties west of Fort Worth in the pre-dawn darkness of Jan. 23, 1887.

“Two masked men got into the cab at Gordon and presented their revolvers at the engineer and commanded him to ‘pull out,’” the Dallas Weekly Herald reported five days later. “They ran the train about a mile from Gordon and…commanded the engineer to stop the train on a bridge with high trestle-work, which prevented any communication from the passenger coaches to the mail and express cars.”

Plainly impressed by the bandits’ expertise, the newspaper noted, “They had chosen an admirable place for their work, and had carried their plan into perfect execution.” The chronicler might have been even more impressed had he known that the hold-up was carried out by two brothers, who until the previous month had led crime-free lives.

Thu
24
Jan
Edgar's picture

Ol’ Roanie

“How ya doin’ Skip?” I asked.

“Okay, I guess,” he said. “Remember my good rope horse?”

I remembered. Skip, like me is left-handed and therefore requires a left-handed heelin’ horse. Whenever I’m in southern New Mexico he lets me borrow ol’ Roanie.

Last time I had been to his place to rope I got there early so I saddled up and was warmin’ up the horse. I didn’t remember him bein’ quite so belligerent and feisty. He made a couple stops where I had to grab the horn!

When Skip arrived he explained why Roanie was actin’ up. It wasn’t Roanie. It was the other horse.

The other horse, which had a big scar on his shoulder, was also a roan. He was the flotsam of a relationship gone bad. Skip had wanted to sell him but the now departed love interest had insisted he keep him so they could go on romantic rides together. Skip roped on him now and then but it was always a risky venture. He kept thinkin’ if he roped on him enough, he might make a good horse.

Thu
17
Jan
Edgar's picture

Prejudice

Prejudice is a funny thing. When a city slicker or a dude comes meanderin’ into the Montana bar in Glasgow he’s liable to get a lot of hard stares. But, I’m here to tell ya, when the shoe’s on the other foot, it can be mighty uncomfortable.

Years ago in Kansas City, I set out one night to find one of them ‘down home guitar blues pickers that I had read about in the Sunday paper. I was drivin’ around Saturday night lookin’ for Walter’s Crescendo Lounge.

I had some ribs at Money’s on Prospect and asked directions. The feller told me not to go over there after dark. Then, after thinkin’ about it, he scribbled his name and phone number on a piece of paper and said, “When you git in trouble, have’m call me.” Nice of him, I thought.

 

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Thu
17
Jan
Edgar's picture

MODEST INVENTOR WHO CHANGED THE WORLD

This Week In Texas History

The month after bringing home the Nobel Prize for Physics, Jack Kilby found himself back in the spotlight on Jan. 16, 2001 as the Texas legislature honored the creator of the microchip. Everyone who has ever used a calculator, cell phone, digital camera, pacemaker or the multitude of other high-tech gadgets that present-day inhabitants of this planet take for granted owes a debt of gratitude to the unassuming genius who made it all possible. But he would have been the last person to remind anybody of that.

Although many sources cite Jefferson City, Missouri as his birthplace, Jack St. Clair Kilby clearly disagreed. In the autobiographical statement requested by the Nobel Committee, he wrote, “I was born in 1923 in Great Bend, Kansas.”

 

Thu
10
Jan
Edgar's picture

OILMAN JOHNNY-ON-THESPOT AT SPINDLETOP

By Bartee Haile

 

This Week In Texas History

“Buckskin Joe” Cullinan arrived at Spindletop on Jan. 11, 1901, less than 24 hours after the eruption of the Lucas gusher, ready to bet his bottom dollar that the bonanza would spark the biggest oil boom ever.

The son of Irish immigrants was born in Pennsylvania on New Year’s Eve 1860 just a few miles from the first producing well on the North American continent. Going to work for Standard Oil as a 22 year old roughneck, he climbed to the top rung of the corporate ladder in a fast-paced 15 years.

Cullinan received an unusual letter in 1897 from the mayor of Corsicana, Texas. A fortune in black gold lay beneath his sleepy community, the civic leader claimed, but no one had the money or the know-how to retrieve the fossil fuel. Could the oil executive come take a look?

 

Thu
03
Jan
Edgar's picture

KICKAPOOS KICK BUTT IN CIVIL WAR BATTLE

Just passing through West Texas en route to Mexico, the Kickapoos went out of their way to avoid a fight on Jan. 8, 1865.

The first sign of the Kickapoo exodus from the Indian Territory was detected the previous month at the headwaters of the Brazos River. Militiamen on routine reconnaissance stumbled across an empty camp of 92 wigwams and ten tents that had been vacant a couple of days at most. The two dozen volunteers hurried home with the hysterical hunch that hundreds of hostiles were on the warpath.

Thu
27
Dec
Edgar's picture

A Christmas Tree

A Christmas tree is one of those things Like popcorn balls or angel wings That children make in the snow.

Things with beauty unsurpassed That touch our lives but never last More than a week or so.

It shines from every living room Like someone in a bright costume That’s happy to see you drop by.

 

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Thu
27
Dec
Edgar's picture

FORT WORTH NAMED FOR MEXICAN WAR HERO

This Week In Texas History

Six months after leading the last American division out of Mexico City, Gen. William Jenkins Worth arrived in Galveston on Dec. 26, 1848 to take command of the department of Texas.

On the eve of the inevitable conflict with Mexico, 52 year old Worth was the most highly respected officer in the United States Army. Besides an impeccable record in war and peace, most rated him the best looking man in uniform and the finest horseman in the military.

Beginning at the bottom as a lowly private, the New Yorker served with distinction in the War of 1812. Before sustaining a serious wound in battle against the British, he rose in record time to the rank of major.

 

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