Opinions

Thu
25
Apr
Edgar's picture

FAMOUS BARNSTORMER FORGOT TO PACK PARACHUTE

This Week In Texas History

Ignoring an old friend’s foreboding premonition, Bessie Coleman took her stunt plane for a test spin prior to a Florida air show on Apr. 30, 1926. But the safety-conscious barnstormer somehow forgot to pack a parachute.

“Brave Bessie” was born in 1893 less than a dozen miles from the Arkansas border in the northeast Texas community of Atlanta. Her father, who was three-quarters Cherokee, returned to his reservation roots around 1900, and her mother, strongwilled daughter of a freed slave, settled at Waxahachie south of Dallas.

Even though four offspring had died in childhood and five had left home, Susan Coleman still had four hungry mouths to feed. Life was a day-to-day struggle, as she took in washing and little Bessie and a sister picked cotton, but no one missed a meal in the loving home.

 

Thu
25
Apr
Edgar's picture

BAXTER BLACK

“Age-in’ a cow is ‘bout the thing I hate most. Seems like they can tell the instant you cross the line into the strike zone.”

We all nodded sympathetically with Jeff’s pronouncement. Each cowman in the circle of chairs could remember a blow to the ribs that ruined his day.

“Well your doin’ it all wrong,” spoke Gary, “Mouthin’em is easy. Just check ‘em after you feed in the evenin’. Timing is critical. Wait till the sun is setting low and drive along the west side of the fence or feedbunk. They’ll look up to check you out, all of ‘em chompin’ and chewin’ and curious. If you’ve planned it right the sun will light up their dentures like you had a spotlight!”

 

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Thu
18
Apr
Edgar's picture

Two Jumps

Two Jumps said he used to ride bulls. In spite of his name, he tried. He had grit, determination and bravado on his side. Unfortunately, he lacked skill. He was naturally inept And as life laid down her cowpies, that’s precisely where he stepped. But even a hard luck cowboy’s entitled to one guru Whose faith in him is undaunted, whose loyalty strays true blue. Now, all of the young bronc stompers and bullriders knew Lecille. A rodeo clown and hero to all who strapped on the steel.

 

 

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Thu
18
Apr
Edgar's picture

RUNNING 200,000 MILES

Tumbleweed Part Owner of Texas

When Dave Dial was a six-year-old boy he would ask his father to stop the car so he could get out and run. “We might have gone to the store and were on our way home when I would tell my dad I wanted to run the rest of the way home.”

Dave has been running ever since. For the past eleven years he has run at least 15 miles a day.

 

 

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Thu
18
Apr
Edgar's picture

GOLIAD SURVIVOR RUNS FOR HIS LIFE FOR WEEKS

This Week In Texas History

While Texans were fighting the final battle for their independence on Apr. 21, 1836, a survivor of the Goliad Massacre was spending his twenty-first day on the run.

Twenty year old John Crittenden Duval and his older brother Burr were members of the large Kentucky contingent that answered the Texans’ appeal in the early stage of the Revolution. When Col. James Fannin surrendered over the objections of his officers on Mar. 20, 1836, the Duvals were among the hundreds of volunteers who fell into enemy hands.

 

 

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Thu
11
Apr
Edgar's picture

“THE WHIRLWIND” RID RIO GRANDE OF RAIDERS

In a joint resolution on Apr. 11, 1882, the Texas legislature praised Lt. John Lapham Bullis for his heroic service “in behalf of the people of the frontier of this State, in repelling the depredations of Indians and other enemies of the frontier of Texas.”

Bullis was born and raised in western New York not far from the shores of Lake Ontario. His Quaker upbringing in that serene setting did not prepare him for the Civil War or years of fighting raiders along the Rio Grande.

Thu
11
Apr
Edgar's picture

The Romantic Cowboy

There’s nothing like an evening of calving to promote the romantic image of the cowboy. Right, ladies?

Don invited a nice woman out to his ranch in Alberta for an evening of candlelight, wine and canned bean dip. This dinner date coincided with calving season. After an hour of civilized conversation about French painting, Brexit and the condition of the rodeo arena in Ponoka, Don invited his date to go with him to check the cows.

She didn’t exactly squeal with delight but he explained how scientific livestock raising had become. “Almost like visiting a human hospital maternity ward,” he said, authoritatively.

They drove his F-250 out into the calving pasture and immediately spotted a braymer cross cow tryin’ to calve. “We’ll watch her for a few minutes to see if everything comes out okay,” suggested Don sliding an arm around her shoulders.

Thu
04
Apr
Edgar's picture

90% Taxes is Nothing New

This year I’m having a déjà foo.

I remember learning in high school social studies that the maximum income tax then was 90%! I was stunned! Over the years I watched President Kennedy reduce the max tax to 62%.

In 1989 Reagan reduced the max-tax to 28%. Tax Creep rose then George W. Bush knocked it back to 30% after the 9/11 depression and now, President Trump has used tax relief to lift a chronic economy out of stagnation.

It is an old cycle. Lately some politicians have proposed Socialism as a future for America whereas max-taxes of 70 and 90% are demanded. But do you think well-off Americans will pay these exorbitant taxes? OF COURSE NOT!

 

 

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Thu
04
Apr
Edgar's picture

TEXAS GUNFIGHTERS RECRUITED FOR WYOMING WAR

This Week In Texas History

A special train carrying 22 hired guns from Texas rolled out of Denver on Apr. 5, 1892 bound for Wyoming and a bloody prairie purge.

By the time Wyoming became a territory in 1868, huge herds of hardy longhorns imported from Texas roamed its wideopen spaces. For a couple of decades, there was room enough for ranchers big and small, but the winter of 1887-1888 changed all that.

A hot and dry summer was followed by record-breaking blizzards and temperatures as low as 50 degrees below zero. Losing thousands of cattle, the big ranches abandoned their live-and-let-live policy toward small-time cowmen in favor of a get-tough policy.

 

 

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Thu
28
Mar
Edgar's picture

Letters

Editor: Song #14 As a musician, one of my favorite songs is the Western Folk song “Home on the Range”. It was sung by the Noon Lions Club, along with patriotic songs like “My Country ‘tis of thee” and “America the Beautiful”. We opened the meetings with song and prayer for the meal.

 

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