Opinions

Thu
17
Jan
Edgar's picture

Prejudice

Prejudice is a funny thing. When a city slicker or a dude comes meanderin’ into the Montana bar in Glasgow he’s liable to get a lot of hard stares. But, I’m here to tell ya, when the shoe’s on the other foot, it can be mighty uncomfortable.

Years ago in Kansas City, I set out one night to find one of them ‘down home guitar blues pickers that I had read about in the Sunday paper. I was drivin’ around Saturday night lookin’ for Walter’s Crescendo Lounge.

I had some ribs at Money’s on Prospect and asked directions. The feller told me not to go over there after dark. Then, after thinkin’ about it, he scribbled his name and phone number on a piece of paper and said, “When you git in trouble, have’m call me.” Nice of him, I thought.

 

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Thu
17
Jan
Edgar's picture

MODEST INVENTOR WHO CHANGED THE WORLD

This Week In Texas History

The month after bringing home the Nobel Prize for Physics, Jack Kilby found himself back in the spotlight on Jan. 16, 2001 as the Texas legislature honored the creator of the microchip. Everyone who has ever used a calculator, cell phone, digital camera, pacemaker or the multitude of other high-tech gadgets that present-day inhabitants of this planet take for granted owes a debt of gratitude to the unassuming genius who made it all possible. But he would have been the last person to remind anybody of that.

Although many sources cite Jefferson City, Missouri as his birthplace, Jack St. Clair Kilby clearly disagreed. In the autobiographical statement requested by the Nobel Committee, he wrote, “I was born in 1923 in Great Bend, Kansas.”

 

Thu
10
Jan
Edgar's picture

OILMAN JOHNNY-ON-THESPOT AT SPINDLETOP

By Bartee Haile

 

This Week In Texas History

“Buckskin Joe” Cullinan arrived at Spindletop on Jan. 11, 1901, less than 24 hours after the eruption of the Lucas gusher, ready to bet his bottom dollar that the bonanza would spark the biggest oil boom ever.

The son of Irish immigrants was born in Pennsylvania on New Year’s Eve 1860 just a few miles from the first producing well on the North American continent. Going to work for Standard Oil as a 22 year old roughneck, he climbed to the top rung of the corporate ladder in a fast-paced 15 years.

Cullinan received an unusual letter in 1897 from the mayor of Corsicana, Texas. A fortune in black gold lay beneath his sleepy community, the civic leader claimed, but no one had the money or the know-how to retrieve the fossil fuel. Could the oil executive come take a look?

 

Thu
03
Jan
Edgar's picture

KICKAPOOS KICK BUTT IN CIVIL WAR BATTLE

Just passing through West Texas en route to Mexico, the Kickapoos went out of their way to avoid a fight on Jan. 8, 1865.

The first sign of the Kickapoo exodus from the Indian Territory was detected the previous month at the headwaters of the Brazos River. Militiamen on routine reconnaissance stumbled across an empty camp of 92 wigwams and ten tents that had been vacant a couple of days at most. The two dozen volunteers hurried home with the hysterical hunch that hundreds of hostiles were on the warpath.

Thu
27
Dec
Edgar's picture

A Christmas Tree

A Christmas tree is one of those things Like popcorn balls or angel wings That children make in the snow.

Things with beauty unsurpassed That touch our lives but never last More than a week or so.

It shines from every living room Like someone in a bright costume That’s happy to see you drop by.

 

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Thu
27
Dec
Edgar's picture

FORT WORTH NAMED FOR MEXICAN WAR HERO

This Week In Texas History

Six months after leading the last American division out of Mexico City, Gen. William Jenkins Worth arrived in Galveston on Dec. 26, 1848 to take command of the department of Texas.

On the eve of the inevitable conflict with Mexico, 52 year old Worth was the most highly respected officer in the United States Army. Besides an impeccable record in war and peace, most rated him the best looking man in uniform and the finest horseman in the military.

Beginning at the bottom as a lowly private, the New Yorker served with distinction in the War of 1812. Before sustaining a serious wound in battle against the British, he rose in record time to the rank of major.

 

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Thu
20
Dec
Edgar's picture

END OF MEXICAN REVOLUTION AFTER 13 BLOODY YEARS

This Week In Texas History

Confident of American support for his coup, the latest leader in the musical chairs of the Mexican Revolution called on the U.S. consul at Veracruz on Dec. 20, 1923.

To the relief of the Mexican people, 13 years of chaos and carnage appeared to be behind them. The faction-ridden struggle with its cast of self-centered characters had cost them dearly — two million dead and at least 750,000 refugees, a quarter of a million to Texas alone.

Alvaro Obregon had ruled the ruined country for three relatively peaceful years since the “suicide” of the previous president, Venustiano Carranza. Exhausted Mexicans welcomed the calm after the endless storm and prayed Obregon would keep his promise to transfer power to his anointed successor, Plutarco Elias Calles, without the usual bloodshed.

 

 

Thu
20
Dec
Edgar's picture

THE REINDEER FLU

You remember that Christmas a few years ago,when you waited all night for ol’ Santy to show

Well, I heard the reason and it just might be true, the whole bunch came down with the dang reindeer flu!

The cowboy elves had been busy all day a doctorin’ Donner and scatterin’ hay

Dancer and Prancer were febrile and snotty, Comet and Cupid went constantly potty

 

 

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Fri
14
Dec
Edgar's picture

BOUNDARY SECRET SPARKS A PRESIDENTIAL SPAT

by Bartee Haile

A career diplomat told President Andrew Jackson on Dec.  17, 1829 the inside story of how the Sabine River became the dividing line between Louisiana and Spanish territory — a political bombshell Old Hickory waited 15 years to drop.

The 1803 treaty that closed the sweetest land deal in American history — the Louisiana Purchase — failed to set hard and fast boundaries. Negotiations with Spain remained at an impasse until 1819, when an obliging secretary of state gave up a long-standing claim to Texas in exchange for Florida. To the surprise and delight of the Spaniards, John Quincy Adams additionally agreed U.S. sovereignty ended at the Sabine River.

 

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Fri
14
Dec
Edgar's picture

TANGO SED

It doesn’t make much difference how fast a horse can run if the jockey doesn’t cross the finish line with him. 

Annie is a jockey and horse trainer of good reputation. She passed along this story about a horse we’ll call TANGO SED.

 

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